Music News

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN RECALLS FIRST HEARING DYLAN, THE BEATLES, AND 'HUNGRY HEART' SUNG BACK TO HIM

In Rolling Stone's ongoing video series "The First Time," Bruce Springsteen gives a personal look into some of the most life changing musical experiences. In the clip, "The Boss" talks about the first time he heard the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Hank Williams, and punk -- among other things.

Springsteen recalled being 14 and hearing the "Fab Four" come blasting out of his family's car radio -- a moment that forever changed his life: "'I Want To Hold Your Hand' came on the radio in, 19. . . I don't know. . . 64. That was going to change my life, because I would successfully pick the guitar up and learn how to play. And after that, it was nothin' but rock n' roll and guitars."

Although Springsteen was aware of Bob Dylan through covers of his songs by the Byrds, Sonny & Cher, Peter, Paul, & Mary, and the Turtles -- he didn't personally hear Dylan until he went electric: "I didn't hear all the early Bob Dylan records. I first heard Bob when he was on Top 40 radio -- so, that must've been 1964, '65. And it was 'Like A Rolling Stone,' so that, that changed my life."

Springsteen recalled back in 1980, the first night he heard the crowd sing the first verse of "Hungry Heart" back to him -- a longstanding tradition at every show it's performed at: "It was one of the most awful sounding places I've ever been in. And we did a soundcheck, and it sounded -- it didn't even sound bad; it wasn't good enough to sound bad, that's how bad it (laughs) was. And, so, I figured this is gonna be nothin' but a disaster. But that night, we kick into 'Hungry Heart' and the entire audience sang it back, ended up being an incredible show, and from that point on -- this is way, pre-Internet -- people sang it every single night."

IN OTHER SPRINGSTEEN NEWS

In his sprawling new chat with Rolling Stone, Bruce Springsteen spoke honestly about the current state of the union, explaining, "If we want to have the America that we envision, it's going to need some pretty serious systemic changes moving leftward. . . . The power of the American idea has been abandoned. It's a terrible shame, and we need somebody who can bring that to life again. I think if we get Joe Biden, it's gonna go a long way towards helping us regain our status around the world. The country as the shining light of democracy has been trashed by the administration. We abandoned friends, we befriended dictators, we denied climate science."

When pressed about his thoughts of the recent Republican convention, Springsteen said, "Horrific. Just seeded with constant lies and total distortion of the American idea. It's heartbreaking and terrible. The first thing is to get the Trump administration out of office and start again."

AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN ON CROWDS SINGING 'HUNGRY HEART'
AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN ON BOB DYLAN ON TOP 40 RADIO
AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN ON THE BEATLES' 'I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND'

55 YEARS AGO TODAY: THE SUPREMES RECORD 'I HEAR A SYMPHONY'

It was 55 years ago today (September 22nd, 1965) that the Supremes recorded their Number One hit, "I Hear A Symphony." The song was written by Holland-Dozier-Holland -- the team responsible for the group's previous Number Ones, including "Back In My Arms Again," "Baby Love," and "Come See About Me."

Prior to releasing "I Hear A Symphony," the Supremes' string of five straight Number Ones was broken when their single "Nothing But Heartaches" stalled at a disappointing Number 11. Co-writer Lamont Dozier recalled that the failure of that single to dent the Top Ten forced Motown founder Berry Gordy to look outside the songwriting team to find the Supremes next hit. That spurred the team into producing a future classic.

Dozier recalls that, "It was humiliating. . . it taught us humility (and) we started frantically looking for new ideas. . . Brian (Holland) was playing this melody. . . it was sounding sort of classical to me. . . Eddie (Holland) took it and ran with the lyrics." "I Hear A Symphony" hit Number One on November 20th, 1965, knocking the Rolling Stones' "Get Off My Cloud" out from the top spot and going on to hold the position for two weeks.

Although Holland-Dozier-Holland were never too self-congratulatory with their many Motown successes, years after its release Brian Holland says that the lyrics to "I Heard A Symphony" actually reduced him to tears: "Only one song ever really got me. I talked to my brother about it years ago, it was 'I Hear A Symphony.' Somehow, I was coming out of a health club, and it was on the radio. And then I just start taking in the lyrics, (I) pulled over and my eyes started tearing up, y'know what I mean. There were some hell of a lyrics on that, man. 'Cause it kept going on and building. What he did, he built upon top of emotion on top of emotion -- which really got me. 'I hear a symphony. . . as you talk to me. . . (laughs) as you touch me. . . as you. . .' Y'know what I mean? You just build upon emotion and it really got to me."

Eddie Holland was mainly responsible for writing the lyrics to the team's classic songs, and explained the legendary Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting progress: "The basic thing is that, sometimes the track, they'd cut it, they'd give me a demo with the melody line. Sometimes it would have an idea, sometimes it wouldn't. But whatever the situation was, I would have to come up with an idea, write the song, teach the artist the song, take the artist in the studio to dub them in. "

Former Supremes member Mary Wilson says that although she still enjoys performing many of the Supremes hits in concert, "I Hear A Symphony" is one she admits is too tough to sing: "I sing all of our songs, but some of them I can't sing. Some of them were so much Diane (Diana Ross) songs -- y'know, so much her -- that it's hard, 'cause I can't sing 'I Hear A Symphony.' I mean, I try, but I just can't sing it, and I just think that they were just such a match with Diane and Holland-Dozier-Holland."

Lamont Dozier told us he's especially proud of the fact that Holland-Dozier-Holland was able to take people minds off the atrocities of the 1960's: "The '60s were a very terrible time. I think we brought some balance; I like to think we brought some balance to the emotions that people were feelin'. We constantly wrote about love, and being happy, dance music, things like 'Mickey's Monkey' -- that had nothin' to do with the times, but sort of an escape for the people with all of these changes that were taking place. We tried to keep people focused on 'Hey there's a better life, there's good things in life to look forward to' and I like to think we were optimistic in our music."

In addition to "I Hear A Symphony," Holland-Dozier-Holland are responsible for writing and producing such Motown classics as Marvin Gaye's "How Sweet It Is," the Four Tops' "Standing In The Shadows Of Love," "Bernadette," "It's The Same Old Song," "I Can't Help Myself," and "Reach Out (I'll Be There)"; Martha & the Vandellas' "Nowhere To Run," "Heatwave" and "Jimmy Mack"; and the Supremes' Number One hits "Where Did Our Love Go," "Baby Love," "Stop! In The Name Of Love," "Come See About Me," "Back In My Arms Again," "You Can't Hurry Love," "You Keep Me Hangin' On," "Love Is Here And Now You're Gone," and "The Happening."

AUDIO: MARY WILSON I HEAR A SYMPHONY
AUDIO: LAMONT DOZIER ON SONGWRITING IN THE 60S
AUDIO: EDDIE HOLLAND ON HOW HOLLAND-DOZIER-HOLLAND WORKED
AUDIO: BRIAN HOLLAND ON THE EMOTION OF 'I HEAR A SYMPHONY'

NEW DAVID CROSBY ALBUM FEATURES DONALD FAGEN & MICHAEL McDONALD COLLABORATIONS

David Crosby revealed that his upcoming solo album features contributions from both Michael McDonald and Steely Dan's Donald Fagen. Crosby, who's been recording the set with his keyboardist son James Raymond, told Record Collector: "At the moment, it looks like it's being called Lifting Force. It's mainly me, and James writing it, but Michael McDonald helped us write a song, called 'River Rise,' which he also sings on."

"Croz" went on to say, "And I'd teased, wheeled, begged, and bothered Donald Fagen for some time, then finally he sent me a really good set of words. James and I wrote music to it and it's really scrumptious. It's called 'Rodriguez Tonight,' about a bandit."

Ever the proud papa, Crosby added: "Wait 'til you hear the s*** James has written for this new record. It's stunningly f***ing good music."

Over the past few years it's seemed as though as his peers started to slow down, David Crosby has only gained speed while going from strength to strength with amazingly relevant albums and performances. We asked him what's bringing on the newfound burst of inspiration: "The easy money would be to say, 'Well, I was all constrangled (sic) being in that group and as soon as I got outta the group, I blossomed.' I don't know if it's that simple. I think I was actually workin' on these tunes even while I was in Crosby, Stills, & Nash -- but I don't think I had a venue for 'em there. I don't think they would've been, y'know, good to do with that group. Whichever way it was -- that's what happened. I quit them and I started doing this and it's been spectacular as far as the writing goes. I've been just so lucky."

AUDIO: DAVID CROSBY ON NEWFOUND CREATIVITY

MATCHBOX TWENTY ANNOUNCES CAREER SPANNING VINYL BOX SET

Set for release on November 20th is Matchbox Twenty's 2020 box set. The limited edition vinyl collection includes all five original studio albums -- including three debut pressings -- along with the Exile On Mainstream Revisited LP packed with rare bonus tracks. The 2020 box set is available now for pre-order with the first 100 copies signed by the band.

The limited edition collection will include all of the band's studio albums, including debut pressings of Mad Season, More Than You Think You Are, and North. The five-album set also includes an expanded version of Exile On Mainstream Revisited, including 10 additional bonus and rare tracks also pressed for the first time on vinyl.

The new set features as 24-page booklet filled with exclusive band photographs, liner notes and a career retrospective penned by Billboard executive editor Melinda Newman. Fans can also expect "an extensive rollout of archival footage and newly remastered music videos over the coming months, in addition to contesting opportunities to win autographed box sets, a signed test print of Yourself Or Someone Like You, summer 2021 concert tickets & more."

Matchbox Twenty drummer Paul Doucette told us that creating catchy tunes is simply part of the band's musical DNA: "A lot of times the big single, great song are not necessarily the same thing and we're trying to write great songs. So, we don't really feel the pressure of like, 'Hey it's gotta be a radio hit or whatever.' That said, I think the strength of the band is we just have a natural radio sensibility -- a natural pop sensibility. That's just who we are. That's just what we do. I think no matter how hard we try, we don't write songs that are like, not catchy. That's our strength."

AUDIO: PAUL DOUCETTE ON MATCHBOX TWENTYS POP SOUND

REPORT: IS PAUL McCARTNEY PREPPING LONG AWAITED 'McCARTNEY III' SOLO SET???

The Beatles' online fan community is all a buzz over rumors that Paul McCartney is finally prepping his third one-man-band album, presumably titled McCartney III. McCartney famously kicked off both the 1970's and ''80s with solo sets and new clues are leading fans to believe that 2020 might end with the third all-McCartney collection.

During a recent chat with GQ, "Macca" spoke about creating new music while in isolation: "I've been able to write and get into music, starting songs, finishing songs. I've had a few little things to write and it's given me the time to finish some songs that I hadn't found the time to get around to, you know? I've been recording using lots of hand wipes and disinfectant and social distancing, which was good because I don't like not working."

According to The Daily Beatle, some recent moves behind the scenes might be pointing to a new release this year: "Some people have been looking at songs registered by McCartney on the ASCAP site, and found these unreleased titles: 'Special Day,' 'Quiet Moment,' and 'Til You Drop.' it was recently revealed that the domain name 'mccartneyiii.com' had been registered by CSC Corporate Domains on August 28, 2020 -- this is the same company who registered 'paulmccartney.com,' and recently, 'flaming-pie.com.'"

Last May marked the 40th anniversary of Paul McCartney's second one-man-band collection, 1980's McCartney II. The album, which peaked at Number Three, received a mixed critical reaction upon release, yet is now thought of as one of the most groundbreaking sets of the decade. McCartney explained that although there have been no overtly obvious solo releases like the McCartney albums -- the one-man-band concept lives on in his recent work: "I've always had in the back of my mind a McCartney III thing, but some of them have turned into Fireman (projects) -- for instance the Fireman's latest (album) Electric Arguments could be said to be in the category, 'cause I played and sung pretty much everything on it. But it's always in the back of my mind -- when I get a moment's time!"

AUDIO: PAUL MCCARTNEY ON POSSIBLE 'MCCARTNEY III' LP

NEW POLL LISTS TOP 20 SOLO OZZY TRACKS

The readers of Ultimate-Guitar.com rated their favorite solo Ozzy Osbourne tracks over the past 40 years. Not surprisingly, seven of the songs came from his 1980 debut, Blizzard Of Ozz, and four from its 1981 followup, Diary Of A Madman. Topping the list were a pair of 1980 classics -- "Mr. Crowley" at Number One and "Crazy Train" at Number Two. 1983's "Bark At The Moon" came in at Number Three, followed by 1991's "No More Tears" at Number Four, with the Top Five rounded out by the 1981 title track to Diary Of A Madman.

Ozzy Osbourne admitted to us a while back he's never been one for conventional lyrics: "I'm not one of these guys that can write about boy-meets-girl and, I mean, it's got to mean something to me. I don't write all the lyrics, but I have to say, 'Well, y'know, isn't that strange that that happened when this happened,' and I'll get going, y'know?"

The Top 20 Solo Ozzy Osbourne Tracks - via the readers of Ultimate-Guitar.com:

1. "Mr. Crowley" - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
2. "Crazy Train" - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
3. "Bark At The Moon" - Bark At The Moon (1983)
4. "No More Tears" - No More Tears (1991)
5. "Diary Of A Madman" - Diary Of A Madman (1981)
6. "Shot In The Dark" - The Ultimate Sin (1986)
7. "Mama, I'm Coming Home" - No More Tears (1991)
8. "Over the Mountain" - Diary Of A Madman (1981)
9. "Flying High Again" - Diary Of A Madman (1981)
10. "I Don't Know" - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
11. "Suicide Solution" - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
12. "Perry Mason" - Ozzmosis (1995)
13. "Goodbye To Romance" - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
14. "Revelation (Mother Earth)" - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
15. "Hellraiser" - No More Tears (1991)
16. "Mr. Tinkertrain" - No More Tears (1991)
17. "Miracle Man" - No Rest For The Wicked (1988)
18. "S.A.T.O." - Blizzard Of Ozz (1980)
19. "Believer" - Diary Of A Madman (1981)
20. "Dreamer" - Down To Earth (2001)

AUDIO: OZZY OSBOURNE ON WRITING UNCONVENTIONAL LYRICS

On Air Now

ROCK All Night
12:00am - 6:00am
ROCK All Night

Weather

Podcasts

More DRIVE Rock News

Breaking News

TheDRIVE Recommends