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ZAKK WYLDE SAYS HE'LL PLAY RHYTHYM GUITAR ON OZZY OZBOURNE'S NEW ALBUM

Zakk Wylde has revealed that he'll play rhythym guitar on Ozzy Osbourne's upcoming album. Wylde told Music Radar about the new album, "The new Ozzy stuff is sounding great. And for sure, it's an honor to play on a record with all my heroes."

Wylde will be playing alongside Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Tony Iommi.

He continued, "It's pretty cool. … I can't wait for everyone to hear it. I've always loved Blow by Blow and Wired, but honestly every record Jeff Beck has put out is amazing."


FLASHBACK: JOHN LENNON ENDS RETIREMENT AND RELEASES '(JUST LIKE) STARTING OVER'

It was 41 years ago Saturday (October 23rd, 1980) that John Lennon's "comeback" single "(Just Like) Starting Over" was released, breaking Lennon's then-five year hiatus from recording. Lennon had devoted himself to becoming a self-proclaimed "house husband" following the birth of his and Yoko Ono's son Sean in 1975. "(Just Like) Starting Over" was a teaser for the forthcoming joint album between him and Yoko called Double Fantasy, which was released on November 17th. It was the last song completed for the album, using portions of Lennon's unfinished songs "My Life" and "The Worst Is Over."

At the time of the song's release, Lennon recalled how he immediately knew that the song had commercial potential: "It was obvious because it was the one where the musicians got very loose. Because it was so simple rock n' roll, there was no prob -- y'know, they really relaxed and they'd all be like that after it. Even though I don't think it's the strongest track, perhaps, but 'Starting Over' was the best way to start over. And to me, it was like going back to 15 and singing ala (Elvis) Presley (sings, imitating Elvis), like that. And it's a kind of parody, but not really a parody."

Lennon's assistant Fred Seaman says that Lennon never considered "(Just Like) Starting Over" as being among his most inspired creations: "'Starting Over' was what John would call a 'formula song.' It was kind of a pastiche -- a little bit of Elvis (Presley), a little bit of Roy Orbison, a little bit of other rockers that influenced John. And the lyrics are cliched, and it's a song that John didn't particularly enjoy writing or recording, but he felt he had to because the marketplace expected it."

Seaman says that in 1980, Double Fantasy producer Jack Douglas played an integral role in getting Lennon up to speed with modern recording techniques: "He hadn't been in the studio for a long time. He was behind in the technology, and his way of coping with it was, he just wanted more and more tracks. He wanted to multi-layer his voice -- y'know, two, three, (laughs) 10 times. He didn't like the sound of his raw voice and Jack accommodated him, and in the end, they got a great sounding record out of it."

Prior to Lennon hitting the studio in early August 1980, Lennon had Douglas transcribe his demos and was rehearsing the musicians in secret, with none of them knowing who they would be recording with. The night before the first session, all the players finally gathered at Lennon's apartment at the Dakota for a makeshift and loose rehearsal of the songs.

Jack Douglas recalls that Lennon had a Fender Rhodes electric piano, just inside of his apartment to work out ideas either when he first entered the apartment or vice versa. It was the night before the start of the Double Fantasy sessions that Lennon sprung on the musicians what would be his comeback single: "After that rehearsal at the Dakota, the night before the studio, we're all walking out. Almost everyone's gone except (guitarist Hugh) McCracken, (bassist Tony) Levin, and myself. We're, like, we're approaching the door, and John -- just before we got to the door, said, 'Before you go, Jack, I want you to hear this song.' And he played Tony and Hughie and I 'Starting Over' on the Rhodes, sang it, and sat down. . . And I said, 'John, that's a great song, it's perfect for this record, why don't we do that the first song that we do, so that we're rehearsing it for a little while and then recording it. And that way you'll get a good vibe with the whole rhythm section, 'cause you'll be working on a song with them from scratch.' And he said, 'That's a great idea,' and that was the first song we recorded."

Stephen Bard, co-host of the leading Beatles podcast, 'Fabcast,' recalled hearing "(Just Like) Starting Over" for the first time in October 1980: "'(Just Like) Starting Over' was a genius record from the first moment; with that guitar, and that voice, and that kind of almost strange delay, and there's the guy who made it all happen for us! He's back! What a beautiful introduction to that record. And then the drums kick in and it's off to the races. So, hearing it for the first time on the radio was a major moment. And I thought, ‘Wow, this is a hit!'"

Upon the release of Double Fantasy album, John Lennon was excited to spread his positive message to the baby boomer generation: "When I was singing and writing this and workin' with her, I was visualizing all the people of my age group; I'm singing to them. I'm saying, 'Here I am now, how are you? How's your relationship going -- did you get through it all? Wasn't the '70's a drag (laughter)? Here we are, let's try to make the '80s good, y'know?' It's not out of our control. I still believe in love, I still believe in peace, I still believe in positive thinking. Where there's life, there's hope. Because I always consider my work one piece and I consider that my work won't be finished until I'm dead and buried and hope that's a long, long time."

"(Just Like) Starting Over" debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 9th, 1980 -- the 14th anniversary of John and Yoko's first meeting -- and eventually hit Number One on December 27th. "(Just Like) Starting Over" held the top spot for a total of five weeks and stayed in the Hot 100 for 22 weeks.

"(Just Like) Starting Over" was the second chart-topper by a solo Beatle in the 1980's, with Paul McCartney & Wings having scored a Number One hit the previous summer with "Coming Up (Live In Glasgow)."

"(Just Like) Starting Over" marked only Lennon's second solo Number One, following 1974's "Whatever Gets You Thru The Night," and stands as the 12th U.S. chart-topper by a solo Beatle.

AUDIO: JOHN LENNON ON LIFE IN 1980
AUDIO: STEPHEN BARD ON '(JUST LIKE) STARTING OVER'
AUDIO: JACK DOUGLAS ON FIRST HEARING 'STARTING OVER'
AUDIO: FRED SEAMAN ON THE SOUND OF 'DOUBLE FANTASY'
AUDIO: FRED SEAMAN ON JOHN LENNON AND 'STARTING OVER'
AUDIO: JOHN LENNON ON '(JUST LIKE) STARTING OVER'

HAPPY 85th BIRTHDAY, ROLLING STONE BILL WYMAN!!!!

Happy Birthday to former Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman, who turns 85 on Sunday (October 24th). Wyman, who quit the Stones in 1991, was on hand for the band's 2012 London shows as part of their 50 & Counting Tour. Both Wyman and longtime fans were disappointed that he was relegated to only two songs during the shows, sitting with the band during "It's Only Rock N' Roll" and "Honky Tonk Women."

In 2020, Wyman set the record for the highest selling bass guitar at the three-day "Property From Bill Wyman And His Rolling Stones Archive" sale via Juliens Auctions. Wyman's 1969 Fender Mustang bass with a competition orange finish, which was a mainstay of Stones concerts and recording sessions in 1969 and 1970, sold for a whopping $384,000.

Also raising eyebrows was Wyman's legendary 1962 Vox AC30 Normal model amplifier, which snagged a cool $106,250 -- easily besting last year's sale of two of David Gilmour's prized amps. Wyman's Vox AC30 is particularly historic, seeing as Wyman owning professional gear the band could use cemented his membership into the Stones. A portion of the proceeds from the auction benefited the Prince's Trust, Macmillan Cancer Support, and the Central Caribbean Marine Institute.

In 2019, Bill Wyman published his latest book featuring his previously unseen photos of the band. The 272-page tome, Stones From The Inside, features 246 color shots along with 28 black and white photos showcasing the band on-stage, backstage, and on the road. The book, which spans Wyman's decades with the band, also features timeless shots of such legends as John Lennon, Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Iggy Pop, John Belushi, and Dan Aykroyd, among others.

April 2018 saw the release of Bill Wyman's Rhythm Kings' latest album, Studio Time.

The recent documentary on Wyman, titled The Quiet One, is now available on demand. The Quiet One spotlights never before seen footage and stills from Wyman's massive personal archive and features testimony from Eric Clapton, early-Stones manager/producer Andrew Loog Oldham, Bob Geldof, Stones engineer Glyn Johns, and the Supremes' Mary Wilson.

Bill Wyman, who has recently battled prostate cancer, explained to Variety why he finally allowed his story to be documented: "My life has been an extraordinary adventure. The time feels right to delve into the archive and tell my story before I croak."

On October 28th, 2016 Wyman performed at the "Bill Wyman 80th Birthday Gala" at London's Indigo at The O2. Among the performers saluting the Stones bassist were: Robert Plant, Van Morrison, Mark Nobler, Simply Red's Mick Hucknall, Bob Geldof, and Steve Van Zandt.

From the band's earliest days, Bill Wyman and late-drummer Charlie Watts provided the solid rhythm section behind band leaders Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and the late Brian Jones. Wyman, whose real name is William Perks, was several years older than the rest of the band and caught the music bug much earlier than his bandmates, who were first smitten by the early Elvis Presley and Eddie Cochran singles. By the time Wyman joined the band, he was already a father and a veteran of Britain's Royal Air Force.

Wyman, who was also a songwriter, was all but barred from incorporating his own music into the band's repertoire. In the three decades Wyman was with the Stones, he was only able to get two of his songs onto the band's albums: 1967's "In Another Land" on Their Satanic Majesties Request, and "Downtown Suzie," an outtake from 1968's Beggar's Banquet that was eventually included on the 1975 Metamorphosis compilation. Wyman has also gone on record saying that he composed the Stones' signature opening riff to 1968's "Jumpin' Jack Flash," yet never received credit.

He released several critically acclaimed and musically diverse solo albums throughout the '70s and '80s, including Monkey Grip and Stone Alone, and even scored a surprise 1981 Top 20 UK hit with "(Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star."

Although Wyman's bass playing was always solid, he was affectionately dubbed the "invisible bassist," in contrast to his contemporaries Paul McCartney of the Beatles and the late John Entwistle of the Who, both of whom were considered more distinctive and innovative.

Among the many up-and-coming musicians Wyman discovered was the 14-year-old guitarist Peter Frampton.

Shortly after the band's successful 1989-1990 Steel Wheels/Urban Jungle tour, Wyman officially quit the Stones, although the formal announcement wasn't made until 1993. Wyman explained at the time that he had gotten to a point where he wanted his time to be completely his own: "One of the main reasons I left the Stones was I didn't really want to tour anymore, and I didn't want to spend six months in a studio cutting a record. I didn't want to be that much away from my family. I do have a little family now -- of three little girls of 6, and 5, and nearly 3. I do like to be at home."

Following Wyman's departure, drummer Charlie Watts admitted that apart from making music with his old friend, he missed hanging out with him on the road: "Personally, it's devastating, 'cause I like Bill Wyman a lot. I used to go and sit in his room and he's a very amusing man. I mean, whether he's being serious to me -- when Bill's being serious, he's totally very amusing. So, I'm used to him. It's part of being on the road is, I'd go and knock on Bill's door -- whatever's going on. We'd laugh, or something."

Bill German, the author of Under Their Thumb -- How A Nice Boy From Brooklyn Got Mixed Up With The Rolling Stones And Lived To Tell About It, and the editor of the legendary Stones fanzine Beggars Banquet, told us that Mick Jagger has always been hell bent on doing whatever was necessary to change and modernize his musical approach -- even if it meant chucking Wyman out of the band: "1981 -- Mick goes to the Ritz to see a bass played named Busta 'Cherry' Jones, who winds up playing with David Byrne eventually. What happened was; Mick was going to see Busta 'Cherry' Jones with the possibility of installing him into (laughs) the Rolling Stones! And I didn't know that until a few years later when I'm sitting with Bill Wyman in London, and he reveals to me that Mick has tried to throw him out of the band (laughs) a few times and Mick would do this behind Bill's back, but he would get talked down by the other band members."

In 1990, Wyman published his memoir of his time with the Stones, titled Stone Alone. He followed that in 2003 with a lavish 500-plus page oversized coffee table book, Rolling With The Stones. After that he published Bill Wyman's Blues Odyssey, chronicling the history of blues music in the south, and most recently The Stones - A History in Cartoons, which includes Wyman's doodles from over the years.

A book based on his recent photo exhibit, titled Wyman Shoots, is currently in the works. Wyman says that because his musician friends had such complete trust in him behind the lens, he's careful about what photos of them he chooses: "There's one or two dodgy (laughs) ones of Keith (Richards), y'know, in various forms of misbehavior, but that's about it really. I've got a great one of Jimmy Page sleeping on a plane with a cigarette (laughs) hanging out of his mouth, but I don't think I'll show it because it's not complimentary to him. There are a few things like that I wouldn't show."

Although Wyman is no longer a partner in the Stones franchise, he is considered the band's primary in-house historian and still contributes to their archival projects, including the recent Crossfire Hurricane documentary. Wyman explained in the 2010 Stones In Exile DVD that although Exile On Main Street proved to be among the greatest of the Stones' '70s albums, the sessions were far from being the most productive or professional of the era: "I suppose we had the band there -- the whole band there -- probably 30 percent, 40 percent of the time. The rest of the time it was just bits. Me and Charlie (Watts) and Mick didn't come -- Mick Taylor didn't come -- and me Charlie and Keith (Richards), so we'd work on something. 'Next day Keith wouldn't come because Mick (Jagger) wasn't there, so then Mick'd come and he'd see that Keith wasn't there and the next day he wouldn't come. And sometimes we'd all get there to a session and Keith wouldn't even come! He was upstairs sleeping! Charlie'd come five hours, y'know, me and Mick Taylor had come two hours, Mick had come an hour and Keith is upstairs, and he didn't come down to the session! And it was like, madness."

In 2006 Bill Wyman released a two-disc retrospective, Stoned Alone: The Solo Anthology 1974-2001.

In 2009 Wyman broke his 55-year smoking addiction -- which at times had him smoking up to five packs a day.

Bill Wyman performs frequently with his solo band the Rhythm Kings, who backed Paul Rodgers in December 2007 when he opened for Led Zeppelin at their reunion gig at London's O2 Arena.

Bill Wyman was on hand for the Rolling Stones' 2012 London shows as part of their 50 & Counting Tour. Wyman told us he felt as though his appearance was treated as almost an afterthought: "They wouldn't let me do anymore. I think maybe they were punishing me for leaving (laughs). I thought I'd be playing a lot more, y'know? And they said, 'Y'know, we only want you for two numbers.' And I said, 'I haven't even done a rehearsal -- I did one rehearsal' -- I said, 'I haven't done a soundcheck, or anything.' They said, 'You know 'em! You know 'em!' Y'know, I just did the two -- what was it, 'Honky Tonk Women' and 'It's Only Rock N' Roll.'"

AUDIO: BILL WYMAN ON 50TH REUNION WITH THE ROLLING STONES
AUDIO: BILL WYMAN ON 'EXILE' SESSIONS
AUDIO: BILL WYMAN ON EXCLUDING UNFLATTERING SHOTS FROM PHOTO SHOW
AUDIO: BILL GERMAN ON MICK JAGGER TRYING TO REPLACE BILL WYMAN
AUDIO: CHARLIE WATTS ON BILL WYMAN ON THE ROAD
AUDIO: BILL WYMAN SAYS HE LEFT THE ROLLING STONES BECAUSE OF THE GROUP'S SCHEDULE

WOLFGANG VAN HALEN PERFORMS WITH SPRAINED ANKLE

The show must go on for Mammoth WVH! Ultimate Classic Rock reported on Wednesday night (October 20th) in Huntsville, Alabama, an injured Wolfgang Van Halen took the stage with Mammoth WVH seated, with his foot in a boot after spraining his ankle.

Van Halen tweeted: "Walking off the tour bus this morning and sprained the F*** outta my ankle. Now I gotta rock this boot for four to six weeks. Looks like the boot's gonna get some show experience." He went on to write: "Looks like I'm gonna be Dave Grohl-ing it tonight, folks. Be patient with me."

He later posted a photo of his ankle and wrote: "Never done that before, but we pulled it off! Thanks to Huntsville for making it such a special show! Also, check out how f***ed my ankle is."

Mammoth WVH closes out their shows for the year on Saturday night (October 23rd) in Atlanta at Shaky Knees 2021.


OUT TODAY: ELTON JOHN'S STAR-STUDDED 'THE LOCKDOWN SESSIONS'

Released today (October 22nd) is Elton's John's new album, The Lockdown Sessions, featuring 16 collaborations recorded in isolation and under strict covid safety protocols during the pandemic.

The set features team-ups with Stevie Nicks, Eddie Vedder, Stevie Wonder, Miley Cyrus, Gorillaz,Young Thug and Nicki Minaj, Brandi Carlile, Dua Lipa, Yo-Yo Ma, Robert Trujillo, Chad Smith, and others.

There are few artists to have had as celebrated a career as Elton John. Despite that, he maintains that it's what's still to come that gives him the most excitement and pleasure regarding his work: "It's lovely to go and to look back, but I'm a person who looks forward; I'm more interested in what's going to happen next. I value the past and my career, and sometimes when I go back, I think, 'Oh, that's not band, that's pretty good' -- but I'm all about what's going to happen next. That keeps me on my toes and it keeps me young. It's always about tomorrow and not the past."

The tracklisting to 'The Lockdown Sessions' is:
"Cold Heart" (Pnau remix) - with Dua Lipa
"Always Love You" - with Young Thug and Nicki Minaj
"Learn To Fly" - with Surfaces
"After All" - with Charlie Puth
"Chosen Family" - with Rina Sawayama
"The Pink Phantom" - Gorillaz featuring Elton John and 6lack
"It's A Sin" - with Years & Years
"Nothing Else Matters" - Miley Cyrus featuring Watt, Elton John, Yo-Yo Ma, Robert Trujillo and Chad Smith
"Orbit"- with SG Lewis
"Simple Things" - with Brandi Carlile
"Beauty In The Bones" - with Jimmie Allen
"One Of Me" - Lil Nas X featuring Elton John
"E-Ticket" - with Eddie Vedder
"Finish Line" - with Stevie Wonder
"Stolen Car" - with Stevie Nicks
"I'm Not Gonna Miss You" - with Glen Campbell
AUDIO: ELTON JOHN ON LOOKING AHEAD

DAVE GROHL WAS AFRAID TO WRITE ABOUT KURT COBAIN'S DEATH

Nirvana drummer and Foo Fighters leader Dave Grohl admitted the toughest part about writing his autobiography was addressing Kurt Cobain's 1994 suicide at age 27. Grohl's memoir, The Storyteller - Tales Of Life And Music, topped The New York Times Best Sellers list.

During an appearance on PBS' Amanpour And Company, Dave Grohl was asked why he saved Cobain's death for last when writing the book: "'Cause, I was scared to write it. Y'know, it's one thing to write about gettin' stitches when you're 12-years-old, or it's one thing to write about takin' your kids to the daddy/daughter dance -- it's another thing to write about something that you've barely spoken about with people close to you. I mean, I revealed some things in that story that I've never told my closest friends. First of all, I knew what people wanted me to write. I think that people have a lot of unanswered questions -- as do I. So, I decided to write in, like, a much broader emotional sense."

Grohl explained why he feels Kurt Cobain's songs connected with so many people across the world: "I think that his simplicity and the beautiful, direct language in his lyrics, which I would consider poetry. His specific lens, his perspective on life. He was very open about writing about his own pain, which I think millions of people could relate to and connect with -- because it was just him. That was it. It was just him."

Foo Fighters perform tonight (October 22nd) in Atlanta at the Shaky Knees Festival.

AUDIO: DAVE GROHL ON WHY KURT COBAIN'S MUSIC CONNECTS
AUDIO: DAVE GROHL ON WHY KURT COBAIN'S SUICIDE

THE ROLLING STONES RELEASE SUPER DELUXE 'TATTOO YOU' COLLECTION

The Rolling Stones released their latest archival set, Tattoo You: 40th Anniversary today (October 22nd). The deluxe edition features a new remaster of the 1981 nine-week chart-topper, a bonus disc of nine previously unreleased -- yet heavily bootlegged tracks -- and a two-disc June 1982 performance art London's Wembley Stadium.

Tattoo You was originally released on August 24th, 1981 and was comprised mainly of reworked outtakes from the band's archive dating back to the 1972 sessions for the following year's Goats Head Soup. Tattoo You, which has sold over four million copies in the U.S. alone, featured such instant Stones classics as "Start Me Up," "Hang Fire," "Little T &A," "Worried About You," and "Waiting On A Friend."

Among the highlights on the bonus disc is the band's unreleased Goats Head Soup gem, "Fast Talking Slow Walking," the It's Only Rock N' Roll-era outtake, "Living In The Heart Of Love," and the 1975 Black And Blue-era, early reggae version of "Start Me Up."

Although the Rolling Stones have always been dealing with the shadow of their early days -- Mick Jagger explained that for the most part, they remain one of the lucky bands not lumped in with any particular era or decade: "I find it fascinating when I hear other people talking about it and other groups copying certain periods. I don't find it, very, kind of, interesting to look back too much. You can't ignore what you were, but I think to kind of take that stuff too seriously. . . I'm glad that the Stones aren't labeled a ''60's band' -- and I find increasingly that they're not. They're just not completely tracked in there. That's taken quite a lot of effort."

Keith Richards said that more often than not over the years, he's been the one to lead the charge when it comes to the studio: "I always am for that, because, y'know, the guitars and drums -- I have to play and I have to get them to play, y'know? So that Mick has something (laughs) decent to sing to. I mean, I am the winder-upper in that respect, yeah."

A while back, Mick Jagger explained how and why the Stones end up with so many unfinished tracks left on the cutting room floor: "We were working on about 35, something like that and cuttin' them down -- didn't finish them all 'cause I don't do that anymore. It's such a waste of energy when people say, 'Oh, well I don't really like that one, we won't do it,' and you've spent all this time on it. So, you invest so much in it that you get very disappointed. So, I only really finish the ones I know we're gonna do."

Keith Richards told us that he's always viewed the band's recording career as an ongoing mission as opposed to their contemporaries who recorded specific projects every year: "Albums, what you get when you say, 'Oh, that's that album,' a lot of albums they, like, roll over into the next one. Some of the stuff that you do, and say Sticky Fingers, towards the end, you've got more stuff than you can use; 'Well, we'll just save it.' So, you kind of roll over material that way, and the album becomes what gets on there. But to us, the process is like, continual. 'Let's use these 12 songs, and what do we call it? I know -- Beggars Banquet. I know -- Let It Bleed. I know -- Exile On Main Street.' So, you kinda take snippets of something that's going on all the time."

The tracklisting to The Rolling Stones' 'Tattoo You: 40th Anniversary':

Disc One - 'Tattoo You' (2021 Remaster)

"Start Me Up"
"Hang Fire"
"Slave"
"Little T&A"
"Black Limousine"
"Neighbours"
"Worried About You"
"Tops"
"Heaven"
"No Use In Crying"
"Waiting On A Friend"

Disc Two: Lost & Found: Rarities

"Living In The Heart Of Love"
"Fiji Jim"
"Troubles A' Comin"
"Shame Shame Shame"
"Drift Away"
"It's A Lie"
"Come To The Ball"
"Fast Talking Slow Walking"
"Start Me Up" (Early Version)

Disc Three & Four - 'Still Life' (Wembley Stadium Concert 1982)
"Under My Thumb"
"When The Whip Comes Down"
"Let's Spend The Night Together"
"Shattered"
"Neighbours"
"Black Limousine"
"Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me)"
"Twenty Flight Rock"
"Going To A Go Go"
"Chantilly Lace"
"Let Me Go"
"Time Is On My Side"
"Beast Of Burden"
"Let It Bleed"
"You Can't Always Get What You Want"
Band Introductions
"Little T&A"
"Tumbling Dice"
"She's So Cold"
"Hang Fire"
"Miss You"
"Honky Tonk Women"
"Brown Sugar"
"Start Me Up"
"Jumpin' Jack Flash"
"(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"

AUDIO: KEITH RICHARDS ON LEADING THE CHARGE IN THE STUDIO
AUDIO: KEITH RICHARDS ON ROLLING OVER MATERIAL TO NEXT ALBUM
AUDIO: MICK JAGGER ON THE STONES NOT BEING JUST A '60S BAND
AUDIO: MICK JAGGER ON UNFINISHED OUTTAKES

PAUL McCARTNEY & BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN HELP RAISE $77.5 FOR THE ROBIN HOOD FOUNDATION

Wednesday night's (October 20th) Robin Hood Foundation benefit at New York's Javits Center raised a whopping $77.5 million, according to Rolling Stone. Paul McCartney received a special award for his work back in 2001 in putting together The Concert For New York City at Madison Square Garden and was among a who's who of notables attending the event.

The fundraiser, hosted by host Saturday Night Live's Cecily Strong featured performances by Bruce Springsteen, Alicia Keys -- who performed "Let It Be," and the Jonas Brothers.

Springsteen, who performed an acoustic mini-set addressed the 3,000-strong crowd by saying: "Good evening, everybody. How are those appetizers out there? Is anyone f***in' alive out there? Is anyone f***in' alive?" "The Boss" then went on to play a pair of Born In The USA classics -- "Working On The Highway" and "Dancing In The Dark" before closing with "Thunder Road." On a more serious note, Springsteen explained, "For over 30 years, Robin Hood has been finding, fueling, creating, impactful solutions to lift families out of poverty here in New York City. The funds raised tonight translate into real results for New Yorkers living in poverty. We appreciate your support."

Attending the gala was, former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York mayoral hopeful Eric Adams, Diane Sawyer, Stacey Abrams, Roger Goodell, Eli Manning, and many more.

Paul McCartney told the crowd, "I love New York. Many years ago, when I was a little kid in Liverpool, we saw New York in the movies. I never dreamed that I would be here getting an award like this from you fantastic people. But then years later, we did show up at JFK with my buddies, the Beatles. We went on The Ed Sullivan Show and, boy, that was something."

McCartney went on to joke: "It is fantastic that Robin Hood helps people in need. In fact, the other day we were going through the city and this guy comes up. He's got no shoes on, he's got grey hair, a scraggly beard. I said hi to him. I found out later it was Rick Rubin."


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