Music News

JASON NEWSTED RETURNIUNG TO METAL ON NEW ALBUM

Former-Metallica bassist Jason Newsted is returning full throttle with some new metal music. Ultimate-Guitar.com reported he's just wrapped production on his debut album from his longtime group, the Chophouse Band.

During a chat with Gator 98.7 FM's Gator Garage, Newsted revealed, "Actually, I spent six months of last year putting together The Chophouse Band Volume 1 (album). The Chophouse Band has been together (and) making music since 1992. So it was our first album after 30 years. I spent a lot of time on that. And then, once I got that under my belt, I'm kind of stepping back into the heavy now."

Newsted went on to say, "So the last couple of weeks I've been auditioning guitar players for a heavy project. I'm back on bass and singing with a metal drummer -- double bass, y'know; gettin' loud again. So I've got a couple of irons in the fire. I'm putting two new projects together right now -- but loud."

Jason Newsted chose to split with Metallica after leader James Hetfield gave him an ultimatum between playing with Metallica or spending his downtime with his own solo project, Echobrain. Newsted told us a while back that he never saw how Echobrain could have interfered with Metallica: "I never felt that it was going to affect Metallica in any way. There was no way that it could. The monster and the integrity and the legend that Metallica's built, it would take a lot more than that to ever affect it."

AUDIO: JASON NEWSTED SAYS ECHOBRAIN COULD NEVER HAVE AFFECTED METALLICA

DONNA SUMMER DOCUMENTARY COMING TO HBO IN MAY

Donna Summer's life and career will be chronicled in the new documentary, Love To Love You, Donna Summer, which will run on HBO and stream on HBO Max starting in May. Best Classic Bands reported, Love To Love You, "Is directed by Oscar and Emmy-winning filmmaker Roger Ross Williams and Summer's daughter, Brooklyn Sudano. Described as an 'unexpected and intimate portrait,' the documentary will have its theatrical world premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival."

Donna Summer died on May 17th, 2012 of lung cancer at age 63. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013.

Back in 1978, Donna Summer admitted that she wasn't sure if she was viewed as a serious artist beyond her massive chart success: "I really couldn't tell you. I hope I stand in the light of legitimacy, in a place where people will respect what I do, and understand that any songs that I do I choose to -- and not because that is my limitation. And I think before, that was a problem. They thought that was my limitation."

AUDIO: DONNA SUMMER ON HOW SHE'S VIEWED AS AN ARTIST

FAMED BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN FAN PUBLICATION FOLDS OVER TICKET PRICING

It's the end of an era for Bruce Springsteen fans with the announcement that the magazine/website Backstreets -- a cornerstone in not just Springsteen but of all rock fandom -- is coming to an end after 43 years. The reason for the magazine, which is essentially now just a very active news and message board-based website, coming to a halt is due to Springsteen's recent ticket on-sales via Ticketmaster, which due to the company's pricing structure made some of the events' choice seats completely unaffordable.

Fans were shut out of great seats due to the company's "Dynamic Pricing" -- also called "Platinum Seats" -- which forced the sales into super-competitive market-based pricing. Due to the surge in supply and demand, the prices of some of the seats easily soared past the $5,000 mark -- a situation that was begrudgingly addressed by Springsteen and his management -- but not changed nor amended in any way.

Editor-in-chief Christopher Phillips, who took over Backstreets in 1993 from founder Charles R. Cross, posted a long explanation for the publication to wind down, writing in part:

A key reason something as gonzo as Backstreets has been able to exist, and for so long -- since 1980 -- is that it has consistently sprung from a place of genuine passion, rooted in a heartfelt belief in the man and his music. As difficult as it is to call this the end, it's even harder to imagine continuing without my whole heart in it.

If you read the editorial Backstreets published last summer in the aftermath of the U.S. ticket sales, you have a sense of where our heads and hearts have been: dispirited, downhearted and, yes, disillusioned. It's not a feeling we're at all accustomed to while anticipating a new Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band tour.

We're not alone in struggling with the sea change. Judging by the letters we've received over recent months, the friends and longtimers we've been checking in with and the response to our editorial, disappointment is a common feeling among hardcore fans in the Backstreets community.

With every reason to believe that there will be changes to the pricing and ticket-buying experience when the next round of shows go on sale. . . we simply realized that we would not be able to cover this tour with the drive and sense of purpose with which we've operated continuously since 1980. That determination came with a quickening sense that we'd reached the end of an era.

Bruce Springsteen has long maintained that his live performances are the backbone of his career, which connects him not only to the audience and his bandmates, but ultimately to himself: "I knew that the most important thing to me was when I walked out -- whether it was in a little bar on any stage, how it made me feel. Because I wanna do -- find some way in. Some way to be a part of, I guess, a community that was either really there or that I imagined. That I dreamt of."

Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band next perform on February 7th at Hollywood, Florida's Hard Rock Live.

AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN ON THE IMPORTANCE OF HIS WORK

ROCK LEGENDS PAY FINAL RESPECTS TO JEFF BECK

Jeff Beck, one of the most important and beloved guitarists of the 20th century, was laid to rest on Friday (February 3rd). Britain's Daily Mail reported Beck was buried in Beddington, England at St. Mary's Church. Beck died on January 11th at 78, after contracting bacterial meningitis.

Among the famed friends and mourners was the man he replaced in the Yardbirds, Eric Clapton, former-Jeff Beck Group bandmates Rod Stewart and Ron Wood, along with Robert Plant, David Gilmour, Chrissie Hynde, Bob Geldof, Tom Jones, recent collaborator Johnny Depp, and director Tim Burton.

Jeff Beck worked with numerous music legends throughout his career, but unlike the other Yardbirds guitarists -- Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page -- he never found the right combination of bandmates to spur him into wider popularity. He said that he didn't mind being thought of as a music snob for having very specific tastes: "People will tend to think that really, really, trashy, awful music is music if they're not exposed to anything else and that's bad. I come from a whole different era long before all this stuff was about so I have to tread very carefully not to look as if we're a push button brigade, which we're not at all. My band are very highly skilled players and we wouldn't trade that for the world."

AUDIO: JEFF BECK ON MUSICIANSHIP

DEFINITIVE 1970's PAUL McCARTNEY DOC ANNOUNCED

Paul McCartney's initial post-Beatles solo career will be the basis of a new major documentary, tentatively titled Man On The Run. The film, which is being spearheaded by McCartney's own MPL Communications, will be directed by Morgan Neville -- best known for his work on such critically acclaimed docs as the Rolling Stones' Crossfire Hurricane; 20 Feet From Stardom; Keith Richards: Under The Influence; Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain; and Won't You Be My Neighbor?, among others. No release date nor outlet has been announced.

According to the announcement, Man On The Run, which spotlights McCartney's decade leading his solo band Wings, "Draws on unprecedented access to a never-before-seen archive of Paul and Linda's home videos and photos, as well as new interviews and is fully financed by MPL & Polygram Entertainment and presented and produced by MPL, Polygram Entertainment and Tremolo Productions."

Morgan Neville said in a statement: "As a lifelong obsessive of all things McCartney, I've always felt that the 1970's were the great under-examined part of his story. I'm thrilled to have the chance to explore and reappraise this crucial moment in a great artist's life and work."

Back in 2001 Paul McCartney released his Wingspan documentary chronicling the group's career. As he replayed the band's time together, he said that Wings was first and foremost a lesson in overcoming the impossible: "The great thing about this story is it's got a lot of human drama because it was a struggle trying to put it together after the Beatles. I mean, the Beatles career itself was a struggle, but then having reached those heights, to try and do it over and at the same time bring up a, a young family was quite an interesting human interest story. And that comes over."

IN OTHER McCARTNEY NEWS

Surviving Beatles Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr were caught on camera dancing last Thursday (February 2nd) at L.A.'s Henson Studios.

The "Fabs" were celebrating at Stella McCartney's new collaboration with Adidas and seen bopping along to Candi Staton's 1976 Top 20 disco hit "Young Hearts Run Free."

AUDIO: PAUL MCCARTNEY ON RELIVING WINGS
AUDIO: PAUL MCCARTNEY ON SUING THE OTHER BEATLES

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