National News

Man finds 9-carat diamond, 2nd-largest ever at Arkansas state park

Kevin KinardBy SHANNON MCLELLAN, ABC News

(MURFREESBORO, Ark.) -- When our moms told us to stop playing in the dirt as kids, maybe we shouldn't have listened -- that's exactly how 33-year-old Kevin Kinard found a 9-carat diamond at an Arkansas state park.

Kinard and his friends traveled to Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro, Arkansas, on Labor Day to enjoy the outdoors. The state park offers 37.5 acres of land for "diamond digging" where park visitors can sift through soil on what is the world's eighth-largest diamond-bearing volcanic crater.

Park Interpreter Waymon Cox said one or two diamonds are found daily at the park, though they're usually about 20- to 25-point diamonds, or about a fourth of a carat.

No matter the size, park rules state that if you find a diamond it's yours to keep.

Kinard, an Arkansas native, visited Crater of Diamonds State Park for the first time on a field trip in second grade. Since then, he's traveled back once or twice a year to dig for diamonds but had never found one.

Because of the pandemic, Kinard said he and his friends have been spending more time in state parks.

"I had actually already gone to the park in May, but Arkansas state parks started handing out these state park passports where every time you go to a new park you get a stamp," Kinard said. "So, I went back because we wanted to get our passports stamped."

When digging for diamonds, you'll fill your bag and later give it to a park staffer who helps check whether you've found anything.

Kinard said they dug around for about four hours or so and went to get their passports stamped. Since he didn't think he had anything good, he decided to head back to the car without having his bag checked. It was only when his friend decided last minute to get hers checked that he doubled back with her to see if he had anything.

Kinard was pulled into a private room, where the Crater of Diamonds State Park staff told him a 9-carat diamond was in his bag.

"I broke down a little and started tearing up," Kinard said. "It was a very humbling experience. I thank God for everything that I have, so I think it was the Lord."

The diamond is the second-largest ever found at the park after a 16-carat diamond in 1975.

"Our staff gets excited, even though we're not finding the diamonds," Cox said. "We get excited from the people and seeing how they're impacted."

Kinard immediately brought the diamond to the bank where he works to place it in a safe deposit box. He has not yet gotten it appraised and said for now he just wants to enjoy the moment.

"I'm not sure what it's worth, but I can't do anything with a 9-carat diamond," Kinard said. "My boss said, 'You may be a millionaire. Are you going to quit?' I said, 'Absolutely not.' I'm too young for that. I'd still work. I'm just a regular guy."


NASA pledges to land 1st woman on moon by 2024

iStock/nathanphotoBY: SHANNON MCLELLAN

(HOUSTON) -- It's one small step for a woman, one giant leap for womankind.

NASA gave an official update to their Artemis Plan this week, stating that they will land the first woman on the moon in 2024.

New suit. 🧑‍🚀 New tools. 🛠️ New mission. 🌙@NASA_Astronauts are preparing now for moonwalks planned for when we land the first woman and next man on the Moon -- and they're practicing underwater to evaluate how we'll train for #Artemis missions. More: https://t.co/DPqGRKfmxH pic.twitter.com/hflHIWTbsj

— Johnson Space Center (@NASA_Johnson) September 23, 2020


NASA plans to land the next man on the moon in the same mission. This will be the first time sending humans to the moon since the last Apollo lunar mission in 1972.

"We're going back to the Moon for scientific discovery, economic benefits, and inspiration for a new a generation of explorers," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a press release. "As we build up a sustainable presence, we're also building momentum toward those first human steps on the Red Planet."

LIVE NOW: We are going to the Moon, and here's how.

Administrator @JimBridenstine and other senior leadership discuss our #Artemis Phase 1 plan to return humanity to lunar surface by 2024.

🎙️ Listen in: https://t.co/f1K1MFXFRn pic.twitter.com/18GNq62Elw

— NASA (@NASA) September 21, 2020


NASA will launch their powerful new rocket, the Space Launch System, and the Orion spacecraft together from Kennedy Space Center in 2021 for two flight tests around the moon.

In addition to sending the first woman to the moon, the Artemis Plan will work to search for resources, such as water. Due to new landing technologies, astronauts will also be able to travel farther in order to explore new regions of the moon.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Protesters hit by vehicles at Breonna Taylor demonstrations in Buffalo, Denver

Twitter/@AshleyroweWKBWBY: BILL HUTCHINSON

(WASHINGTON) -- Two protesters were injured in hit-and-run incidents in Colorado and upstate New York on Wednesday night as demonstrations erupted across the county over a Kentucky grand jury's decision not to charge three police officers in the death of Breonna Taylor.

The chants for justice were quickly overcome by screams of horror as drivers in Denver and Buffalo plowed into protesters who spilled into the streets in the hours following the announcement of the grand jury's decision in the Louisville police shooting of 26-year-old Taylor, a certified emergency medical technician killed in her own apartment.

The incident in Buffalo unfolded about 8:45 p.m. as protesters marched in the street near Niagra Square in the downtown area, police said.

Graphic video taken by ABC affiliate station WKBW-TV in Buffalo showed a maroon and white king-cab pickup truck drive directly into a group of demonstrators who pounded on the side of the truck and yelled for the driver to stop just before a protester on a bicycle was hit. The footage shows the truck speeding away as protesters on foot chased after it.

Buffalo police officials said the driver was eventually stopped by officers and detained for questioning. The name of the driver was not released and it remained unclear Thursday if any charges will be filed in the incident.

Calls to a police department spokesperson by ABC News were not immediately returned.

***Warning: Graphic video*** our @wkbw photographer captured the moment a truck drove through a crowd of protesters and struck a person outside Buffalo City Hall. Important to note: police say the person struck has non-life threatening injuries. pic.twitter.com/Vo9IORTYoF

— Ashley Rowe (@AshleyroweWKBW) September 24, 2020


Police said Wednesday night that the protester struck by the truck suffered non-life-threatening injuries and was taken to Erie County Medical Center for treatment.

A spokesperson for Slow Roll Buffalo, a nonprofit community group of bicycle enthusiasts, told WKBW that the woman who was hit by the truck is a member of its board of directors. The spokesperson said the woman suffered broken bones and was in stable condition Thursday morning.

A similar incident unfolded in Denver outside the state Capitol Building, police said. Video taken by ABC affiliate station KMGH-TV in Denver showed a silver Volvo station wagon approach demonstrators marching in the street and stop.

In the footage, a small group of protesters gathered around the car and instructed the driver to turn around. Several protesters were standing in front of the vehicle and banging on its hood as the car began to move forward and accelerate, knocking one female protester to the ground.

The driver sped away but was stopped by police a short time later and detained, police said on Twitter. The driver's name was not immediately released and charges against him are pending further investigation, a Denver police spokesman said in an email to ABC News on Thursday.

Police said in a Twitter post that no one was injured in the incident. But the video shot by KMGH showed the protester, who was knocked down, apparently shaken up, sitting on the sidewalk with other demonstrators who rushed to provide her with emergency aid. The woman told the Denver Post that she was not badly injured.

The two incidents came just hours after a Kentucky grand jury indicted former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree in the shooting that killed Taylor, but neither he nor the other two officers involved in the fatal encounter were charged in her death.

An investigation headed by Kentucky State Attorney General Daniel Cameron determined that Louisville Metro Police Department officers Myles Cosgrove and Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly were justified in using deadly force because Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired at them first when they broke down Taylor's apartment door on March 13 while serving a warrant.

Cameron said the officers knocked first and announced them themselves before ramming the door open when they didn't get an answer, a statement disputed by attorneys for Taylor's family.

The two hit-and-runs on Wednesday mark the latest in a series of incidents in recent months in which protesters have been struck while marching in demonstrations against police brutality and racial injustice.

The most serious incident occurred on July 4 when a protester was killed and another was injured when a car barreled into a Black Lives Matter protest on a closed freeway in Seattle.

Protester Summer Taylor, 24, died from injuries she suffered when she was struck by the car on Interstate 5 in Seattle. Demonstrator Diaz Love, 32, was seriously injured in the episode, according to police.

The driver in the fatal Seattle incident, Dawit Kelete, 27, has pleaded not guilty to charges of vehicular manslaughter, vehicular assault and reckless driving. He remains in custody in King County Jail on $1.2 million bail, according to online jail records.

Kelete’s lawyer, John Henry Browne, said his client did not intentionally hit the protesters. He said the crash was a “horrible, horrible accident."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Coronavirus live updates: CDC forecasts up to 226K US deaths by mid-October

narvikk/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 979,000 people worldwide.

Over 32 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis -- through clinical means or a lab test -- has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the virus has rapidly spread to every continent except Antarctica.

The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 6.9 million diagnosed cases and at least 202,563 deaths.

California has the most cases of any U.S. state, with more than 797,000 people diagnosed, according to Johns Hopkins data. California is followed by Texas and Florida, with over 743,000 cases and over 693,000 cases, respectively.

Nearly 170 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least six of which are in crucial phase three trials.

Here's how the news is developing Thursday. All times Eastern:

Sep 24, 4:33 pm
France reports record case increase


There were 16,096 new COVID-19 cases reported in France on Thursday, marking the highest one-day rise since the beginning of the outbreak, French health authorities said.

The nation now has over 497,000 people diagnosed with COVID-19.

The death toll increased by 52 on Thursday, bringing the fatality total to 31,511.

France reported 4,258 new hospitalizations in the last week, including 718 patients in intensive care.

France on Wednesday announced new restrictions to combat the rise in cases.

Starting Monday in Paris and seven other major cities, outdoor gatherings will be limited to 10 people. Bars must shut their doors at 10 p.m., gyms will be closed and sporting events will be limited to 1,000 spectators.

Marseille, Aix-en-Provence and Guadeloupe are enacting stricter rules; starting Monday all bars and restaurants will be closed.

ABC News' Ibtissem Guenfoud and Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.

Sep 24, 3:38 pm
CDC forecasts 214,000-226,000 deaths by Oct. 17

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention forecasts that the U.S. will lose another 3,400 to 7,400 lives to COVID-19 by Oct. 17, bringing the nationwide death toll to between 214,000 and 226,000.

The national death toll currently stands at 202,404, according to Johns Hopkins University.

ABC News' Anne Flaherty contributed to this report.

Sep 24, 3:29 pm
Boulder bans gatherings for 18 to 22 year olds


In Boulder, Colorado, people ages 18 to 22 will soon be banned from all gatherings, whether indoors, outdoors, or with people outside that age range, the Boulder County Public Health Department announced.

This comes after nearly three weeks of cases rising in Boulder County, "with the vast majority" connected to 18 to 22 year olds, "particularly those attending the University of Colorado Boulder," the department said.

"While there has been little evidence of spread of the virus beyond the 18-22 age group, the continued increase in new cases in the city of Boulder prompted the Public Health Order to help prevent the spread to other community members," the department said.

The health department also calls out 36 addresses where the department claims residents "repeatedly engaged in activities that violate public health orders." Those residents must stay in their homes for two weeks, only leaving for essential services, according to the Health Department.

The order will last for two weeks, beginning at 4 p.m. local time on Thursday.

Residents in the 18 to 22 age group are exempt for exercising outside alone, studying outside alone and going to work if they don’t live in one of the homes with stay-at-home requirements.

Young adults can interact with relatives they live with, and those in high school can participate in school activities, the department added.

"While there has been little evidence of spread of the virus beyond the 18-22 age group, the continued increase in new cases in the city of Boulder prompted the Public Health Order to help prevent the spread to other community members," the department said.

ABC News' Jennifer Watts contributed to this report.

Sep 24, 1:47 pm
UK reports highest number of new daily cases


The United Kingdom reported 6,634 daily COVID-19 cases on Thursday, reaching a new record high.

The U.K. now has over 412,000 coronavirus cases and at least 41,951 fatalities, according to Johns Hopkins data.

ABC News' Mike Trew contributed to this report.


Sep 24, 1:02 pm
Contact tracing app launched in England, Wales


The United Kingdom’s long-awaited contact tracing app launched in England and Wales on Thursday.

The app, available to download for free on iPhones and Androids, alerts users if they've come into contact with anyone diagnosed with COVID-19.

"The app will advise you to self-isolate if you have been in close contact with a confirmed case," the Department of Health and Social Care said. "It will also enable you to check symptoms, book a free test if needed and get your test results."

The BBC reported that over 1 million people have already downloaded the app.

ABC News' Mike Trew contributed to this report.


Sep 24, 12:15 pm
Africa sees steady decline of new cases


Africa has seen a steady decline in the number of new COVID-19 cases being reported across the continent since July 20, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

Over the past four weeks, there were 77,147 new cases recorded in Africa, down from 131,647 reported in the previous four weeks. Some of the continent's most-affected countries including Algeria, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Senegal and South Africa have all seen infections drop every week over the past two months. Deaths attributed to COVID-19 have also remained low in the region.

Africa was the only region in the world to report a decline in both new COVID-19 cases and deaths for the week of Sept. 14-20.

The WHO credited the decline to "a variety of socio-ecological factors as well as early and strong public health measures taken by governments across the region." The socio-ecological factors include low population density and mobility, hot and humid climate and lower age group.

"The downward trend that we have seen in Africa over the past two months is undoubtedly a positive development and speaks to the robust and decisive public health measures taken by governments across the region," Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, the WHO's regional director for Africa, said in a statement Thursday. "But we must not become complacent. Other regions of the world have experienced similar trends only to find that as social and public health measures are relaxed, cases start ramping up again."

Africa's COVID-19 cases have largely been among a younger age group and more pronounced in a few nations rather than continent-wide, suggesting country-specific aspects are driving the pattern of disease and death. About 91% of infections in sub-Saharan Africa are among people below the age of 60, while over 80% of cases are asymptomatic, according to the WHO.

Although African governments have made efforts to improve COVID-19 testing, the level remains low. Nevertheless, the WHO said missed COVID-19 cases are largely because they are asymptomatic and that there is no evidence of miscalculation of death figures.

"Africa has not witnessed an exponential spread of COVID-19 as many initially feared," Moeti said. "But the slower spread of infection in the region means we expect the pandemic to continue to smolder for some time, with occasional flare-ups."

Sep 24, 10:40 am
Russia sees highest daily caseload since July


Russia confirmed 6,595 new cases of COVID-19 over the last 24 hours, the country’s highest single-day increase since July.

An additional 149 coronavirus-related deaths were also recorded in the past day, according to Russia’s coronavirus response headquarters.

Meanwhile, Moscow reported more than 1,000 new cases over the last 24 hours for the first time since June. The Russian capital also registered 15 new deaths.

Russia’s cumulative total now stands at over 1.12 million confirmed cases -- the fourth highest caseload in the world -- and nearly 20,000 deaths.

Last month, Russia became the first country in the world to officially register a COVID-19 vaccine and declare it ready for use. The Russian government approved the vaccine before completing its final Phase III trial, and no scientific data has been released from the early trials so far.

ABC News' Alina Lobzina contributed to this report.


Sep 24, 10:09 am
870,000 more Americans filed for 1st-time unemployment last week


Another 870,000 Americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits last week, the U.S. Department of Labor said Thursday.

While the number of people filing for unemployment insurance in the United States has stagnated in recent weeks, the latest figure shows a concerning uptick of 4,000 compared with the previous week's revised figure. It is also the 27th straight week of historically high weekly jobless claims.

Despite the number falling significantly since March, when 6.9 million people applied for unemployment benefits in a single week, the latest figure also shows that workers are continuing to be laid off at an unprecedented rate some six months into the coronavirus pandemic.

More than 26 million Americans are still receiving some sort of unemployment insurance benefits as of the week ending Sept. 5, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. For the same period last year, that figure was 1.5 million.

ABC News' Catherine Thorbecke and Zunaira Zaki contributed to this report.

Sep 24, 8:17 am
Swiss authorities quarantine university's undergraduate students

Swiss authorities have ordered a quarantine for the entire undergraduate student population of a prestigious hospitality management school after "significant outbreaks" of COVID-19.

Health officials in Switzerland's Vaud canton, or region, announced Wednesday that all 2,500 undergraduate students at the "Ecole hoteliere de Lausanne" (EHL) must self-quarantine until at least Monday, whether they live on- or off-campus. Those who develop symptoms are advised to get tested for COVID-19, if necessary.

"Significant outbreaks of infection have appeared in several levels of training, making it impossible to close more targeted than that of the 2,500 students concerned," health officials said in a statement, adding that student parties are suspected to "be at the origin of these numerous outbreaks of infection."

Classes will continue online in the meantime.

Health officials said the school's administrators are taking "all the necessary measures" to ensure that learning isn't disrupted and to reinforce health measures on campus.

ABC News has reached out to the school for comment.

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, Switzerland's Federal Office of Public Health has reported at least 51,492 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 4,809 hospitalizations and 1,776 deaths.

Sep 24, 6:43 am
Israel moves to tighten restrictions as cases climb


Israel's government has decided to tighten coronavirus-related restrictions as cases continue to climb, despite a second nationwide lockdown.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's cabinet voted early Thursday to close all nonessential businesses, including open-air markets. The cabinet also agreed that prayers and political demonstrations should be limited to open spaces with a cap of 20 people and that participants should not be allowed to travel more than 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) from home to attend either.

The new measures are set to go into effect Friday afternoon, as the Jewish state shuts down for the weekly Sabbath ahead of Yom Kippur on Sunday and Monday. The restrictions on demonstrations, however, are subject to approval by Israel's parliament, the Knesset.

Israel has seen one of the world's highest per capita rates of COVID-19 infections over the past two weeks. The country entered a second lockdown last Friday and it's slated to last until mid-October.

Sep 24, 5:57 am
22 US states and territories in upward trajectory of new cases


An internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Wednesday night shows that 22 U.S. states and territories are in an upward trajectory of COVID-19 infections, while 13 jurisdictions are at a plateau and 21 others are in a downward trend.

The number of new cases and the number of new deaths recorded in the United States are both increasing in week-over-week comparisons. There also continues to be a steady rise in the number of hospitals nationwide where more than 80% of beds in intensive care units are filled, according to the memo.

In Alabama's Limestone County, 90% of ICU beds across two hospitals were in use. The Alabama Hospital Association confirmed that a shortage of nurses is a statewide issue in both hospitals and universities due to a lack of faculty, facilities and funds, the memo said.

Florida's Leon County reported a 20% increase in COVID-19 cases among children since Aug. 10, around the start of the new school year, coinciding with a 20% increase in pediatric hospitalizations, according to the memo.

Meanwhile, the number of new cases recorded in Kentucky have increased by 21% since Sept. 13. The state's seven-day fatality rate has doubled since then, from 13.4 to 26.4 per 1 million population. The number of COVID-19 tests being conducted statewide declined by 45.2% during the week ending Sept. 17, compared with the previous week, according to the memo.

Michigan's seven-day case rate increased by 154.4% from Sept. 13 to Sept. 20. The state also reported a 38.1% week-to-week relative increase in COVID-19 testing on Sept. 17. Officials attribute the surge to schools and colleges, with 20-year-olds making up the largest portion of total cases, the memo said.

Sep 24, 4:51 am
US records over 1,000 new deaths


An additional 1,098 coronavirus-related fatalities were recorded in the United States on Wednesday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

Wednesday's tally of COVID-19 deaths is lower than the country's record set on April 17, when there were 2,666 new fatalities in a 24-hour reporting period.

There were also 36,330 new cases of COVID-19 confirmed across the nation on Sunday, down from a peak of 77,255 new cases reported on July 16.

A total of 6,934,205 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 201,909 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.

By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country's cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July. The daily tally of new cases has gradually come down since then.

An internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Wednesday night shows that the number of new cases and the number of new deaths recorded in the United States are both increasing in week-over-week comparisons.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Breonna Taylor decision ignites protests from New York to Chicago to Seattle

Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesBY: EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Protests ignited in Louisville and swept across the U.S. overnight as Americans unleashed outrage after a Kentucky grand jury indicted one officer for allegedly endangering the neighbors of Breonna Taylor during the police shooting that resulted in her death.

Former Louisville officer Brett Hankison was indicted Wednesday on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for allegedly endangering Taylor's neighbors when he fired into the apartment complex.

The neighboring apartment had three people inside, thus the three charges against Hankison, said Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron. The other officers involved in Taylor's death were not charged.

Taylor family attorney Ben Crump tweeted, "NOTHING for the murder of Breonna Taylor. This is outrageous and offensive!"

The news fueled protests in Louisville, where over 100 were arrested and two officers were shot. Both officers' injuries were non-life-threatening.

Protests, mostly peaceful, spread across the country.

New York

In New York City, hundreds of peaceful protesters gathered in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

No one was arrested, according to ABC New York station WABC.

Hundreds at 59th and 5th Ave right now demanding #JusticeForBreonnaTaylor #blm #BlackLivesMatter pic.twitter.com/noeuHVuooY

— CeFaan Kim (@CeFaanKim) September 23, 2020

Dozens on bikes encircling the group, forming a buffer between protest and police. #BarclaysCenter #abc7ny #BreonnaTaylor pic.twitter.com/KWhR5zbt3V

— Josh Einiger (@JoshEiniger7) September 23, 2020

NOW: Several hundred protesters converge on #BarclayCenter. #BreonnaTaylor pic.twitter.com/9jnxWAhhPG

— Josh Einiger (@JoshEiniger7) September 23, 2020


Seattle

Protests turned violent in Seattle when protesters violently clashed with authorities.

Video captured a police officer who was walking his bicycle walk the bike over a protester who was lying on the ground.

That officer has been placed on administrative leave and the incident has been sent to the King County Sheriff’s Office for a potential criminal investigation, said Seattle police.

Police bicycle pushed over man’s neck as he lies on the ground at Breonna Taylor protest in Seattle. https://t.co/zzsFffiTBp pic.twitter.com/SGTGjXaTiG

— ABC News (@ABC) September 24, 2020


When protesters approached the East Precinct, someone threw an explosive that went through a gate and exploded near bike officers. A few minutes later, wires that power the security cameras to the precinct were cut, police said.

An unlawful assembly was declared after multiple fires were set and explosives were thrown at officers, according to police.

"Protestors continue to throw rocks, bottles, and even a fire extinguisher at officers," the Seattle police said.

Multiple officers were injured, including one who was hit with a baseball bat, which cracked his helmet, according to police.

Officers "deployed pepper spray and blast balls," police said.

More than a dozen people were arrested with charges ranging from property destruction, resisting arrest and assault on an officer, police said.

Commanders on scene have declared the ongoing protest an unlawful assembly after multiple fires have been set, explosives have been thrown at officers, and property damage in the surrounding area. Leave the area immediately or you may be subject to arrest.

— Seattle Police Dept. (@SeattlePD) September 24, 2020


Buffalo, New York

In Buffalo, New York, a pickup truck hit a protester, authorities said.

The victim was not seriously hurt, the Buffalo News reported.The victim was taken to a hospital, according to ABC Buffalo affiliate WKBW.

***Warning: Graphic video*** our @wkbw photographer captured the moment a truck drove through a crowd of protesters and struck a person outside Buffalo City Hall. Important to note: police say the person struck has non-life threatening injuries. pic.twitter.com/Vo9IORTYoF

— Ashley Rowe (@AshleyroweWKBW) September 24, 2020


The suspected driver was stopped by police, according to WKBW. It's unclear whether the protester was hit intentionally.
Washington, DC

In Washington, D.C., a crowd gathered at Black Lives Matter Plaza, near the White House.

8:50 pm: Here you can see the crowd gathered on Black Lives Matter Plaza, the White House behind them. pic.twitter.com/j2odDpUeIQ

— Heather Graf (@ABC7HeatherGraf) September 24, 2020

More mpd bikers are trying to get in but protesters are blocking them again things are getting very intense #BlackLivesMatter #BreonnaTaylor #JusticeForBreonnaTaylor#dcprotest #dcprotests #blmprotest #BLM #HappeningNow #BLMDC#Breakingnews #ACAB #DC #WashingtonDC #Breakingnews pic.twitter.com/pp6FBHscv2

— RawsMedia (@rawsmedia) September 24, 2020


Atlanta

In Atlanta, demonstrators recited Taylor's name and chanted: "What do we want?" "Justice!" When do we want it?" "Now!"

Another #JusticeForBreonnaTaylor rally Happening RIGHT NOW in Atlanta.@wsbtv #BreonnaTaylor pic.twitter.com/jYW0daHmAf

— Audrey Washington (@AudreyWSBTV) September 23, 2020

"To think that I could be asleep in my bed and then officers barge in and kill me and nothing happens to the officers. Enough is enough!"#JusticeForBreonnaTaylor rally#BreonnaTalyor @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/InY6FPgzSi

— Audrey Washington (@AudreyWSBTV) September 23, 2020


After hours of protesting, a crowd headed to the Capitol Building, where Georgia State Patrol Troopers used tear gas to get people to disperse,reported ABC Atlanta affiliate WSB.

The large #JusticeForBreonnaTaylor rally I told you about an hour ago has moved from Woodruff Park to the State Capitol.@wsbtv #Breonna pic.twitter.com/b1zvNek9fL

— Audrey Washington (@AudreyWSBTV) September 24, 2020


Some people were arrested.

Denver

In Denver, a man was detained for driving through a crowd of demonstrators, reported ABC Denver affiliate KMGH. A protester hit by the car told The Denver Post she was not seriously hurt.

March for Breonna Taylor has been going on peaceful as hundreds have marched from the Capital to the Federal Building in protest on the ruling on the death of Breonna Taylor in Kentucky @DenverChannel pic.twitter.com/SdtCPmwe2f

— Cameron Duckworth (@CameronDenver7) September 24, 2020


Chicago


Hundreds protested in Chicago, from the South Side to police headquarters.

"The grand jury today couldn't even say her name," said Father Michael Pfleger of St. Sabina Church, reported ABC Chicago station WLS.

"When you take someone's life, it shouldn't matter who it is or who you are. You should be held accountable," protester Teyonna Lofton told WLS.

"She didn't get the justice that she deserved," protester Anna Acosta added to WLS.

A couch was set on fire in a street and officers put the blaze out, WLS reported.

Portland

On the streets of Portland, a Molotov cocktail was thrown toward officers, police said.

Portland police said an awning outside a precinct was lit on fire and "multiple rocks" were thrown, leaving substantial damage.

'Say her name'

Demonstrations also broke out in other cities, from Los Angeles to Nashville to Philadelphia.

Protest for #BreonnaTaylor still underway in Philadelphia | LIVE VIDEO: https://t.co/kmU88EGOV7 pic.twitter.com/BrWAGkHLR4

— Action News on 6abc (@6abc) September 24, 2020


Many protesters across the country chanted "say her name," a rallying cry to remember 26-year-old Taylor who was shot dead by police while in her Louisville home on March 13.

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were asleep when three Louisville police officers, including Hankison, tried to execute a "no-knock" search warrant.

The officers were investigating a suspected drug operation linked to Taylor's ex-boyfriend. No drugs were found in the apartment.

Walker contends he asked the officers to identify themselves as they tried to break open the door, but got no response, which prompted him to open fire with his licensed gun.

Camerson said Detective Myles Cosgrove and Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly were "justified" when they opened fire 22 times during the incident since they were returning fire.

Mattingly was shot in the leg, according to Cameron.

Cameron said no shots from Hankison struck Taylor.

Hankison was fired and the other officers involved were placed on administrative duty.

Federal prosecutors are looking into potential civil rights charges.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Breonna Taylor protests in Louisville: Two officers shot will recover, over 100 demonstrators arrested

iStock/ChiccoDodiFCBy EMILY SHAPIRO and IVAN PEREIRA, ABC News

(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- Two Louisville police officers shot during Wednesday night's protests are doing well and will survive their injuries, announced interim police chief Robert Schroeder, who also said that more than 100 people were arrested during the demonstrations that followed the grand jury's decision in the Breonna Taylor case.

Maj. Aubrey Gregory, who is the commander of Louisville police department's special operations division, was shot while leading the protest response on the ground, Schroeder said. Gregory has since been treated and released from a hospital for a gunshot wound to the hip, Schroeder said.

The other officer who was shot is Robinson Desroches, who was struck in the abdomen. He underwent surgery and is in stable condition and expected to recover, the interim chief said.

One suspect was arrested and charged with two counts of first-degree assault and 14 counts of wanton endangerment directed against police officers, Schroeder said.

President Donald Trump, who earlier Wednesday said he was not familiar enough with the case to comment, tweeted Wednesday night that he was praying for the officers.

"The Federal Government stands behind you and is ready to help. Spoke to @GovAndyBeshear and we are prepared to work together, immediately upon request!" he wrote.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden tweeted, "Even amidst the profound grief & anger today's decision generated, violence is never & can never be the answer. Those who engage in it must be held accountable. Jill & I are keeping the officers shot tonight in Louisville in our prayers. We wish them both a swift & full recovery."

The shooting followed hours of protests throughout Louisville, which erupted after a Kentucky grand jury on Wednesday indicted one officer on charges of endangering Taylor's neighbors during the police shooting that resulted in her death.

After the sole indictment was announced, some wept, some chanted and some marched. Many chanted Taylor's name and "Black Lives Matter," as a line of officers stood shoulder-to-shoulder, blocking them from parts of the city.

Schroeder said during Wednesday night's protests there were several instances of unlawful behavior -- including looting, damage to businesses, damage to a public works vehicle and the moving of barricades -- during which police intervened.

Demonstrators and police in riot gear squared off after some protesters allegedly knocked over patio furniture at a business, according to Louisville ABC affiliate WHAS. Officers allegedly used pepper balls to disperse the crowd.

Louisville police made 127 arrests Wednesday night, Schroeder said.

Maj. Stephen Martin, a spokesman for the Kentucky National Guard, told ABC News that Gov. Andy Beshear authorized the deployment of a portion of the Kentucky National Guard to Louisville.

The governor later activated 500 guardsmen.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced a 72-hour curfew starting at 9 p.m. The police officers were shot Wednesday just before the 9 p.m. curfew went into effect.

On Wednesday, former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison was indicted on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for allegedly endangering Taylor's neighbors when he fired into the apartment complex.

The neighboring apartment had three people inside, thus the three charges against Hankison, said Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron. The other officers involved in Taylor's death were not charged.

Taylor family attorney Ben Crump tweeted Wednesday, "NOTHING for the murder of Breonna Taylor. This is outrageous and offensive!"

"If Brett Hankison's behavior was wanton endangerment to people in neighboring apartments, then it should have been wanton endangerment in Breonna Taylor's apartment too. In fact, it should have been ruled wanton murder!" he wrote.

Taylor's sister, Ju'Niyah Palmer, posted to Instagram, "Sister I am so sorry."

In an Instagram story, Palmer said Taylor, who had previously worked as an EMT for the city, was "failed by a system" she "worked hard for."

Protests spread across the country Wednesday night, from New York City to to Portland to Seattle to Chicago to Atlanta to Washington, D.C., in remembrance of the 26-year-old Taylor.

Taylor was shot dead by police while in her Louisville home on March 13. Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were asleep when three Louisville Metro Police Department officers, including Hankison, tried to execute a "no-knock" search warrant. The officers were investigating a suspected drug operation linked to Taylor's ex-boyfriend. No drugs were found in the apartment.

Walker contends he asked the officers to identify themselves as they tried to break open the door, but got no response, which prompted him to open fire with his licensed gun. Mattingly was shot in the leg, according to Cameron.

The attorney general said Hankison fired no shots that struck Taylor. He added Detective Myles Cosgrove and Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly were "justified" when they opened fire 22 times during the incident since they were returning fire.

Hankison was fired and the other officers involved were placed on administrative duty.

People also turned to social media Wednesday to voice their frustration and anger.

Chanelle Helm, an organizer of Black Lives Matter Louisville, said, "We shouldn't be too surprised at what's happening."

"What is frustrating is that white supremacy, this government and its elected officials continue to deny us healing and any taste of what real justice looks like. Justice in this country is nonexistent," Helm said in a statement. "This country hasn't changed. This country hasn't come to the realization that fascism was its only goal. We move every day for capitalism and not for humanity. Instead of bringing in paths for healing, we keep bringing in more law enforcement, more military and more representations of the systems we desperately need to dismantle."

The ACLU of Kentucky called this "the latest miscarriage of justice in our nation's long history of denying that Black lives matter."

"We join the Taylor family and the community in protesting and mourning the Commonwealth's choice to deny justice for Breonna," the ACLU said in a statement. "Breonna Taylor was killed when plainclothes officers used a no-knock warrant to enter her home in the middle of the night. They did not even perform life-saving measures as she took her last breaths after they shot her five times. Throughout this tragic series of events, including today, the police and prosecutors continuously have failed Breonna Taylor, her family, and Black Kentuckians.

"This outcome shows us that true police accountability does not exist in Kentucky," the ACLU said. "The results of this investigation reflect insufficient standards for police use of force, government-sanctioned violence and terror in communities of color, and a need to completely rebuild our justice system."

Derrick Johnson, president and CEO of the NAACP, tweeted, "Breonna Taylor deserves justice. This was not justice. 1 of the 3 officers was indicted for wanton endangerment. No one was charged for her murder."

"We must take this anger to the polls, and vote this November like we've never voted before," he said. "Black Lives Matter."

Cameron said federal prosecutors are looking into potential civil rights charges.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Beta remnants to soak South as wildfires still rage in West

ABC NewsBy MAX GOLEMBO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Remnants of Beta continue to soak the South, as 4 to 7 inches of rain fell in Louisiana, southern Arkansas and Mississippi in the last 48 hours, which produced flash flooding.

Flood watches have been issued for Mississippi, Alabama and southern Tennessee Thursday morning, as remnants of Beta slowly move northeast.

The heaviest rain will move into northern Alabama and southern Tennessee, where some areas could see 1 to 2 inches of rain per hour Thursday night.

The flood threat moves into the southern Appalachian mountains and the western Carolinas on Friday, including Asheville and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Raleigh and eastern Carolinas get into the heavy rain by Friday afternoon.

The forecasted rainfall totals could reach 2 to 5 inches from Alabama to Tennessee and into the Carolinas.

Meanwhile, in the West, 21 wildfires are still burning in California alone, including the Bobcat fire, which is 113,733 acres. Containment for that blaze almost doubled Wednesday to 39%.

The Creek Fire in northern California is a whopping 289,695 acres, which is the single largest fire in California history. It is only 34% contained.

The worst of the winds will be in the Rockies from Montana down to Utah, where red flag warnings and wind alerts have been issued Thursday.

A fire weather watch has been issued for the northern half of California for this weekend.

Also, some much-needed rain is moving through Washington, Oregon and even northern California Thursday.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Unlicensed caregiver of 89-year-old man arrested for theft of thousands of dollars

Facebook/Yavapai County Sheriff's OfficeBy JON HAWORTH, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- An unlicensed caregiver from Craigslist has been arrested after allegedly stealing thousands of dollars over a four-year period off an elderly and incapacitated 89-year-old man.

Christine Garthright, 51, was arrested and taken into custody on Sept. 23 following a four-month investigation by the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office (YCSO) in Arizona after detectives were able to attribute a financial loss to her patient of more than $13,000, though authorities say the total amount of money she took from him is likely much higher.

Suspicions first began in May earlier this year when a YCSO deputy met with the elderly man and his daughter in Dewey, Arizona, after the daughter, who admittedly had not been monitoring her father’s financial situation for several years, discovered suspicious transactions on his account which led her to suspect that Garthright may have been financially exploiting her father.

The man who had recently suffered a stroke, is hard of hearing, can’t see well and also has occasional memory loss said he relied on Garthright to take care of him as well as act as his transportation since he cannot drive.

“Garthright began self-appointed unlicensed caregiving duties about 4 years ago after travelling from Maryland,” said the YCSO in a statement detailing the case. “The 89-year-old victim requested and allowed her to work as a ‘live-in’ rent free in lieu of a salary. It was learned during this time the victim bought Garthright a car, bought Garthright’s daughter a car and paid her daughter’s rent in Washington state. Additionally, the victim paid several thousand dollars to fix Garthright’s teeth and occasionally paid to allow Garthright to visit her daughter in Washington.”

But when the victim’s daughter took a look at her father’s finances in May, she discovered that Garthright had written a total of 26 unauthorized checks to herself and another eight unauthorized checks to her daughter between June 2018 and May 2020 which added up to more than $11,000.

“She also used the victim’s ATM card without permission to withdraw cash and according the victim, stole several thousands of dollars from his safe,” said the YCSO.

Authorities also allege that Garthright had become verbally abusive, used foul language constantly and even purportedly struck the elderly man in the face when he refused to provide money to her.

Detectives eventually obtained video footage of Garthright’s ATM transactions from the victim’s account.

“Garthright can be seen making cash withdrawals, turn away from view of the vehicle where the victim was sitting, and place cash in a separate pocket,” the YCSO confirmed. “There were occasions where Garthright would make 2 or 3 cash withdrawals in a single ATM visit and stuff the cash in her pocket. The victim confirmed that multiple cash withdrawals during a single visit were never authorized.”

Detectives were able to locate Garthright in July earlier this year but she claimed that all of those financial transactions were authorized by the victim while fully caring for the victim and was not arrested at that time.

Subsequent attempts to reach Garthright were unsuccessful until detectives received a call from her on Sept. 21 saying that she planned to come back to Arizona to see the victim but did not disclose why.

“On September 23, 2020, Garthright did return to the victim’s home and was arrested by the detective,” said the YCSO. “Garthright also knew she had been ordered to stay away from the victim several weeks prior or could be arrested for trespassing and she ignored the order.”

Garthright was then arrested and booked into the Camp Verde Detention Center on charges including Fraud Schemes, Theft, Computer Tampering, Trespassing and Forgery. Bond is set at $50,000.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Twenty inmates, accomplices charged in COVID-19 unemployment fraud

Pennsylvania Department of CorrectionsBy KARMA ALLEN, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Pennsylvania officials charged nearly two dozen inmates and outside accomplices who allegedly conspired to obtain some $300,000 in fraudulent COVID-19 unemployment benefits.

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro charged 20 inmates and accomplices across three state prisons where inmates allegedly gathered personal information from other inmates and distributed them to people on the outside who applied for fraudulent relief funds in their names, officials said Wednesday.

He said the arrests were linked to at least two existing rings of inmates who were charged in similar coronavirus-related fraud cases.

"After announcing our first round of arrests in these COVID unemployment scams, I promised that there were more to come," he said. "Today, 20 more individuals have been charged with illegally taking benefits away from hardworking Pennsylvanians who are struggling during this crisis," Shapiro said in a statement.

He noted the possibility of additional charges, saying: "These arrests are not the end of our investigation, and I'll continue working with my colleagues at the federal level to track down those heading these schemes, along with those who are willfully participating and breaking the law."

His statement came shortly after officials announced a larger roundup of arrests at state correctional facilities in Centre County, out of State Correctional Institution Benner, and in Schuylkill County, at State Correctional Institution Mahanoy.

The Benner ring included two ringleaders -- inmate James Neff Zonge and his girlfriend Adele Moore -- as well as and eight additional inmates.

Moore, a resident of State College, Pennsylvania, and Zonge were accused of helping start the ring. Officials said Moore successfully applied for COVID-19 unemployment benefits on Zonge's behalf and began doing the same for others. Zonge allegedly received about $3,000 from the inmates for his help in filing the claims.

Moore allegedly kept the majority of the money for her own personal use. She also received about $7,000 from inmates for filing the applications and from two of the inmate debit cards that she received for the inmates at her residence. Zonge, meanwhile, netted about $3,000 from inmates for his part in the scheme.

In total, the SCI Benner ring obtained $153,470 in fraudulent COVID-19 unemployment payments, according to the attorney's general office.

The other ring, operated out of State Correctional Institution Mahanoy, was allegedly headed by Wendy Danfora, of York, Pennsylvania, and her inmate boyfriend, Markal Munford, who allegedly gathered personal information from inmates to apply for COVID-19 unemployment benefits in their names.

As part of the scheme, Danfora gave a portion of the fraudulent benefits to the inmates, but kept the majority of the $109,900 in benefits for herself, according to the office.

Munford allegedly gave Danfora names, dates of birth, and social security numbers for other inmates through prison communications starting at the end of May. Prison records show they frequently discussed the scheme during their telephone calls.

Danfora kept the funds to spend on herself and her three children. Together, Danfora and Munford are responsible for at least 13 fraudulent filings, which amount to $78,994.

Individuals are only eligible for COVID-19 unemployment assistance if they are both unemployed for reasons related to the COVID-19 pandemic and available to work. Inmates are ineligible for unemployment benefits while behind bars.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Breonna Taylor's family says lack of homicide charges against officers is 'outrageous and offensive'

Breonna Taylor FamilyBy KARMA ALLEN, ABC News

(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- Family and supporters of Breonna Taylor said Wednesday that a Kentucky grand jury's lack of homicide charges against the police offers who fatally shot Taylor is "outrageous and offensive to Breonna's memory."

Civil rights attorney Ben Crump, who is representing the family, signaled that he expected harsher charges against the Louisville officers who fired shots into the young medical worker's apartment, on March 13.

Instead, amid mounting pressure for a decision in the case, a Kentucky grand jury indicted former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree, but neither he nor the other two officers involved in the fatal encounter were charged in Taylor's death.

"Today's news falls far short of what constitutes justice. But by no means does it define this movement or this moment in our history," Crump said in a statement following the announcement. "The Grand Jury may have denied Breonna justice, but this decision cannot take away her legacy as a loving, vibrant young Black woman who served on the front lines in the midst of a devastating pandemic."

The civil rights attorney called the decision another example of how white officers aren't held accountable for what he referred to as "the genocide of persons of color."

"Her killing was criminal on so many levels: An illegal warrant obtained by perjury. Breaking into a home without announcing, despite instructions to execute a warrant that required it. More than 30 gunshots fired, many of which were aimed at Breonna while she was on the ground," the attorney said. "Many others fired blindly into every room of her home. A documented and clear cover-up, and the death of an unarmed Black woman who posed no threat and who was living her best life. Yet here we are, without justice for Breonna, her family and the Black community."

Louisville police officers, executing no-knock search warrant, used a battering ram to forcefully enter the 26-year-old's apartment.

The charges against Hankison, who fired 10 shots into Taylor's apartment, stem from the errant bullets that penetrated a wall of the residence and entered a neighboring apartment occupied by a child, a man and a pregnant woman, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a news conference following the grand jury's announcement.

As a result, Crump said, "The rallying cries that have been echoing throughout the nation have been once again ignored by a justice system that claims to serve the people. But when a justice system only acts in the best interest of the most privileged and whitest among us, it has failed."

"For the sake of Breonna Taylor, for the sake of justice, and for the sake of all Americans, law enforcement agencies and their representatives throughout the country need to take a long, hard look in the mirror," he added. "Is this who you are? Is this the example you want to set for the rest of the world and for future generations?"

The attorney said he hoped that, through the FBI's ongoing investigation, "we will finally finally get the justice for Breonna that the Grand Jury refused her today."

Louisville Metro Police Department officers Myles Cosgrove, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Hankison executed a no-knock entry warrant on March 13 based on allegations that Taylor had been accepting USPS packages for an ex-boyfriend whom police were investigating as an alleged drug trafficker, according to the warrant.

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were awoken around midnight when they heard a commotion at their front door. Walker fired his licensed handgun in self-defense, saying he thought his home was being broken into, according to police.

The plainclothes officers returned gunfire, firing several shots and fatally hitting Taylor, police said.

"Our investigation found that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in their use of force after having been fired upon by Kenneth Walker," Cameron said. "This justification bars us from pursuing charges in Ms. Breonna Taylor's death."

"The decision before my office as the special prosecutor in this case was not to decide if the loss of Ms. Taylor's life was a tragedy. The answer to that question is unequivocally yes," the attorney general added. "There's no doubt that this is a gut-wrenching emotional case and the pain that many people are feeling is understandable."

"We was failed as a family today," Taylor's sister, Ju'Niyah Palmer, wrote in an Instagram post after the announcement. "My sister, you were failed today by a system you worked hard for and I am so sorry. I love you so so so so so much."

She also shared images and videos from family celebrations showing her slain sister smiling and laughing.

Taylor's family members have become outspoken protesters against police brutality, and Tamika Palmer, Taylor's mother, said the long and intense fight for justice had hindered the grieving process.

"I haven't had time to sit and grieve," she told ABC News in June. "I'm still trying to figure out why my daughter was killed. I'm still trying to figure out, why did it have to come to her being murdered. Why did Breonna have to die?"

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Breonna Taylor shooting case: Hankinson indicted on wanton endangerment of neighbors

DNY59/iStockBY: BILL HUTCHINSON, STEPHANIE WASH and SABINA GHEBREMEDHIN, ABC News

(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- A Kentucky grand jury indicted former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree in a shooting in March that killed Breonna Taylor, but neither he nor the other two officers involved in the fatal encounter were charged in her death.

Louisville Metro Police Department officers Myles Cosgrove, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Hankison unleashed a barrage of shots into Taylor's apartment while serving a warrant in March.

The charges against Hankison, who fired 10 shots into Taylor's apartment, stem from the errant bullets that penetrated a wall of the residence and entered a neighboring apartment occupied by a child, a man and a pregnant woman, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a news conference following the grand jury's announcement.

Cameron said that none of the shots fired by Hankison struck Taylor, a certified emergency medical technician.

The three charges against Hankison specifically state that "under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to human life, he wantonly shot a gun into the apartment" occupied by Taylor's neighbors, according to Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O'Connell, who read the indictment in court.

Cameron said that since there was no surveillance video or police body camera video available, the sequence of events on the fateful morning had to be pieced together through ballistic evidence, 911 calls, police radio traffic and interviews.

Cameron said Taylor was shot six times, contradicting statements from lawyers for Taylor's family that she was shot eight times. He said ballistic evidence examined by the FBI showed that only one shot that hit Taylor was fatal, a .40-caliber bullet that was fired by Cosgrove.

The attorney general said Cosgrove fired 16 times into Taylor's apartment and that Mattingly fired six shots after they were fired on by Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker.

"Our investigation found that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in their use of force after having been fired upon by Kenneth Walker," Cameron said. "This justification bars us from pursuing charges in Ms. Breonna Taylor's death."

Hankison was booked at the Shelby County Detention Center in the Louisville suburb of Shelbyville at 4:30 p.m. and released at about 5 p.m. after posting $15,000 cash bond, a sergeant at the jail told ABC News.

If convicted, Hankison faces up to five years in prison, Cameron said.

Cameron said he spoke with Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, on Wednesday prior to the announcement of the grand jury's decision.

"Every day this family wakes up to the realization that someone they loved is no longer with them. There's nothing I can offer today to take away the grief and heartache this family is experiencing as a result of losing a child, a niece, a sister and a friend," said Cameron, who was appointed as a special prosecutor to investigate the case by Gov. Andy Beshear.

"The decision before my office as the special prosecutor in this case was not to decide if the loss of Ms. Taylor's life was a tragedy. The answer to that question is unequivocally yes," Cameron said. "There's no doubt that this is a gut-wrenching emotional case and the pain that many people are feeling is understandable."

Lawyers for Taylor's family reacted to the grand jury's decision with disappointment that none of the officers were charged in Taylor's death.

“This is outrageous and offensive to Breonna Taylor’s memory. It’s yet another example of no accountability for the genocide of persons of color by white police officers," the family's attorneys Benjamin Crump, Sam Aguiar and Lonita Baker said in a joint statement.

“If Hankison’s behavior constituted wanton endangerment of the people in the apartments next to hers, then it should also be considered wanton endangerment of Breonna. In fact, it should have been ruled wanton murder," the lawyers said.

The attorneys said the charges against Hankison were related to him firing into the apartment of a white family, but noted that no counts were filed in relation to the shots fired into the residence of a Black family that lived above Taylor.

"This amounts to the most egregious disrespect of Black people, especially Black women, killed by police in America, and it’s indefensible, regardless of how Attorney General Daniel Cameron seeks to justify it," the attorneys said.

During his news conference, Cameron did not mention shots being fired into the apartment above Taylor's residence and said he could only speak in "general teams about our independent investigation and findings."

Cameron said the investigation showed the officers were advised by their superiors to knock on Taylor's door in the early morning hours of March 13 and announced themselves. He said Cosgrove, Mattingly and Hankison had no involvement in the investigation nor getting the warrant that led them to Taylor's apartment.

Cameron said an independent witness corroborated that the officers knocked on the door and announced themselves. "In other words, the warrant was not served as a 'no-knock' warrant," he said dispelling earlier reports that it was.

When no one answered, the officers breached the door.

"Sgt. Mattingly was the first and only officer to enter the residence. Sgt. Mattingly identified two individuals standing beside one another at the end of the hall, a male and a female," Cameron said. "In his statement, he said the male was holding a gun, arms extended in a shooting stance. Sgt. Mattingly saw the man's gun fire, heard a boom and immediately knew he was shot as a result of feeling heat in his upper thigh."

He said Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired the shot that hit Mattingly.

"There is no evidence to support that Sgt. Mattingly was hit by friendly fire from other officers," Cameron said, refuting a claim made in a civil suit filed by Walker. "Mr. Walker admitted that he fired one and was the first to shoot."

He said all of the officers had .40-caliber handguns and Mattingly was struck by a 9mm bullet matching the gun Walker was armed with.

Cameron said that in a "matter of seconds" Mattingly and Cosgrove, still standing in the doorway, returned fire. He said Hankison was posted outside a patio sliding glass door and fired multiple times.

The announcement was made more than six months after 26-year-old Taylor's death prompted nationwide protests with demonstrators coast-to-coast repeating her name and celebrities and professional athletes wearing clothes bearing her likeness.

The grand jury's announcement followed a $12 million settlement Taylor's family reached last week with the City of Louisville in a wrongful-death lawsuit Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer filed in April.

Taylor's family had called for criminal charges to be filed against the three officers involved in the shooting.

Palmer said at last week's news conference that while "significant," the settlement was "only the beginning of getting full justice for Breonna,'' who was a certified emergency medical technician.

"We must not lose focus on what the real job is. And with that being said, it's time to move forward with the criminal charges because she deserves that and much more," Palmer said. "Her beautiful spirit and personality is working with all of us on the ground, so please continue to say her name.''

The settlement, which lawyers for the Taylor family say is the largest ever paid out for a Black woman killed in an alleged police misconduct case, also includes an agreement from the city to implement major reforms in the police department in hopes of preventing a similar tragedy from occurring.

The reforms include requiring the police department to overhaul how search warrants are obtained, and to create an Office of Inspector General to oversee an "early-warning system" that tracks use-of-force incidents and citizens' complaints in an attempt to weed out bad officers.

Det. Joshua Jaynes filed a request for a search warrant of Taylor's home on March 12 after investigating the activities of Taylor's ex-boyfriend, who police say was known to them as a drug trafficker, according to the warrant. Police alleged that Taylor's ex-boyfriend was using her address to mail drugs through the post office.

The warrant required the police to verify with postal inspectors that the ex-boyfriend was receiving packages at Taylor's address.

But lawyers for Taylor's family allege the affidavit used to secure the warrant contained lies and that the Louisville Postal Inspector denied that his office inspected packages sent to Taylor's home as part of a drug-trafficking investigation.

No drugs were found in Taylor's apartment, officials said.

Cameron said his investigation did not look into how the warrant was obtained. He said federal authorities are investigating that aspect of the probe.

Federal officials are also investigating if there were any civil rights violations stemming from the shooting.

Lawyers for Taylor's family said in their statement, "It is our hope that through the FBI’s investigation, we will finally get the justice for Breonna that the Grand Jury refused her today."

Prior to the grand jury's announcement, many downtown Louisville business owners boarded up their windows and police beefed up their presence in the area. Police Chief Robert J. Schroeder issued a state of emergency for his department on Monday canceling time off and vacations for officers in anticipation of an update on the state investigation.

Protesters, dismayed by the grand jury's decision, took to the streets of Louisville, resulting in several arrests for failing to disperse.

Mayor Greg Fischer also signed two executive orders on Tuesday to prepare the city for Cameron's announcement, including a state of emergency order due to the potential of civil unrest that allows him to impose a curfew, ban on-street parking in the downtown area and restrict access to five downtown parking garages. The order also allows him to hire or contract services to boost security in and around Jefferson Square Park in the downtown area.

"Our goal is ensuring space and opportunity for potential protesters to gather and express their First Amendment rights after the announcement," Fischer said in a statement. "At the same time, we are preparing for any eventuality to keep everyone safe."

Mattingly, Hankison, Cosgrove and Jaynes were placed on administrative reassignment pending the results of an investigation.

Hankison was later fired for his role in the incident. According to his termination letter that was shared with local reporters, Hankison violated police department procedure when he fired 10 rounds into Taylor's apartment while executing the warrant.

During a news conference Wednesday afternoon, Fischer said the grand jury's conclusions "confirmed our decision to terminate Hankison" on June 23.

"Hankison's actions displayed an extreme indifference to the values of human life," Fischer said. "His actions brought discredit upon himself and the department. His conduct demanded termination."

Asked if the outcome of the grand jury justified settling the lawsuit with Taylor's family, Fischer the settlement was necessary to "begin the healing" in Louisville and reform the police department from top to bottom.

"I know there are people in our community who feel that these charges fall short of achieving justice. So a few reminders: the case is far from over," Fischer said referring to the FBI investigation and an internal affairs probe by the police department.

Louisville Metro Police Department told ABC News that the actions of a total of six officers involved in the Taylor case are being reviewed as part of an internal investigation.

The department's Professional Standards Unit has begun its probe into Cosgrove, Mattingly, and Jaynes, as well as detectives Tony James, Michael Campbell and Michael Nobles, according to Sgt. Lamont Washington, a spokesperson for the agency.

On Monday night, Mattingly sent an email to his police department colleagues expressing support for them having to work in these difficult times.

"These next few days are going to be tough. They are going to be long, they are going to be frustrating. They will put a tremendous amount of stress on your families," Mattingly wrote in the email obtained by ABC affiliate WHAS-TV in Louisville and confirmed to ABC News by Mattingly's attorney, Kent Wicker.

He added, in part, that regardless the outcome of the grand jury hearing, "I know we did the legal, moral and ethical thing that night."

"It's sad how the good guys are demonized, and criminals are canonized. Put that aside for a while, keep your focus and do your jobs that you are trained and capable of doing. I'll be praying for your safety," Mattingly wrote. "Remember you are just a pawn in the Mayor's political game. I'm proof they do not care about you or your family and you are replaceable."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


What happens next in the Breonna Taylor case after former officer Brett Hankison indicted

BlakeDavidTaylor/iStockBy JULIA JACOBO, ABC News

(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- Federal charges in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor are still possible even though a Kentucky grand jury indicted only one Louisville officer and no murder charges were issued in connection with the case.

The FBI is still investigating "all aspects," a spokesperson for the law enforcement agency told ABC News in a statement.

"As we have indicated," the FBI said, "our investigation is focusing on all aspects of Breonna Taylor's death. Once our investigation is concluded, we will provide the collected facts to the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division to determine if federal criminal charges are warranted."

Former Louisville Police officer Brett Hankison was indicted Wednesday on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for allegedly endangering Taylor's neighbors when he fired into the apartment complex. The charge carries a definition of extreme indifference to human life.

Hankison faces a potential 15-year prison sentence -- five years for each charge -- and bond was set at $15,000. He has not yet entered a plea.

People across the country expressed outrage over the lack of a murder charge in Taylor's death. A partial deployment of the Kentucky National Guard to Louisville was authorized, Maj. Stephen Martin, a spokesman for the Kentucky National Guard, told ABC News.

Taylor, 26, died March 13 after three undercover officers, Myles Cosgrove, Brett Hankison and Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, executed a no-knock warrant at the apartment where Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker were living in Louisville.

The officers initially were placed on administrative reassignment pending the results of an investigation.

Hankison was later fired for violating police department procedure when he fired 10 rounds into Taylor's apartment while executing the warrant, according to his termination letter, which had been shared with local reporters. He is appealing his termination.

The charges against him stem from the errant bullets that entered a neighboring apartment occupied by a child, a man and a pregnant woman, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a news conference following the grand jury's announcement.

Cosgrove fired 16 times into Taylor's apartment and Mattingly fired six shots after they were fired on by Walker, but the investigation concluded that they were justified in their use of force, Cameron said.

Taylor's family reached a $12 million settlement with the City of Louisville on the wrongful death lawsuit Taylor's mother filed in April.

Walker allegedly opened fire after the home was entered by the officers who shot and killed Taylor. Walker announced earlier this month that he's suing the city of Louisville, its police department and others, for immunity against his actions that night under Kentucky's "stand your ground" law.

An attorney for Hankison did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.

ABC News' Luke Barr, Bill Hutchinson and Stephanie Wash contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Coronavirus live updates: Fauci details lesser-publicized side effects of COVID-19

Ovidiu Dugulan/iStock

By WILLIAM MANSELL and EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 972,000 people worldwide.

Over 31.6 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis -- through clinical means or a lab test -- has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the virus has rapidly spread to every continent except Antarctica.

The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 6.9 million diagnosed cases and at least 201,204 deaths.

California has the most cases of any U.S. state, with more than 793,000 people diagnosed, according to Johns Hopkins data. California is followed by Texas and Florida, with over 741,000 cases and over 690,000 cases, respectively.

Nearly 170 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least six of which are in crucial phase three trials.

Here's how the news is developing Wednesday. All times Eastern:

Sep 23, 5:12 pm
Missouri governor tests positive


Missouri Gov. Mike Parson and his wife Teresa tested positive for COVID-19 on Wednesday, his office said.

They were tested because Teresa had "minor symptoms," his office said. Gov. Parson has no symptoms.

"All official and campaign events have been canceled until further notice," the office said, adding that the governor's staff has been tested.

"Governor Parson continues to conduct and fulfill all roles of businesses of the state of Missouri from the Governor's Mansion," Parson's office said.

ABC News' Will Gretsky contributed to this report.

Sep 23, 4:50 pm
Indiana to lift nearly all restrictions


Indiana will move to Stage 5, its final phase of reopening, on Saturday, Gov. Eric Holcomb has announced.

Retail stores, malls, restaurants, bars and nightclubs can operate at full capacity under the Stage 5 rules.

There will be no restrictions at gyms and large events like sports, fairs and festivals can resume.

Restrictions will also be lifted at amusement parks and water parks, though people are advised to maintain social distancing.

Masks will still be required.

ABC News' Will Gretsky contributed to this report.

Sep 23, 3:54 pm
France announces new restrictions as cases rise


New restrictions are coming in France as the nation deals with the highest increase of COVID-19 cases in Europe since May.

French Health Minister Olivier Véran announced a set of targeted restrictions Wednesday to be implemented in various cities for two weeks.

Starting Saturday, in Paris and seven other major cities, parties will be prohibited, with outdoor gatherings limited to 10 people.

Bars must shut their doors at 10 p.m., gyms will be closed and sporting events will be limited to 1,000 spectators.

Meanwhile, Marseille and Guadeloupe are enacting stricter rules; starting Monday all bars and restaurants will be closed.

French officials reported 13,072 new cases on Wednesday, just short of the highest daily record of 13,215. France now has over 481,000 COVID-19 cases and at least 31,459 fatalities.

ABC News' Ibtissem Guenfoud and Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.

Sep 23, 3:32 pm
20 times more likely to catch COVID-19 indoors than outdoors: Study


Dr. Blythe Adamson, a former member of the White House coronavirus task force, told "GMA3" on Wednesday, "One of things that we just learned recently -- and published in a new study today in Clinical and Infectious Diseases -- is that being indoors, you're 20 times more likely to catch COVID from an infectious person than if you were around them outdoors."

Adamson is now adviser to Testing for America, a nonprofit established to help solve the testing crisis.

Adamson stressed that the U.S. must "be flexible and adapt, so as we learn more about the science, we're willing to change our public policies so that they match the best science."

"There's a lot of work for us to continue to do over the next couple of months. As we move forward into flu season, it's even more important that we're able to distinguish between a viral infection that's from influenza or coronavirus," she said.

Sep 23, 1:02 pm
Redfield stands by his timeline that most Americans will be vaccinated by summer 2021


While testifying at a Senate hearing Wednesday, Robert Redfield stood by his timeline on when most Americans would be vaccinated. He said the expectation is that millions of doses will be ready by April and that it could take until summer 2021 to get the vaccine to most Americans.

“I think that’s going to take us to April, May, June, possibly July to get the entire American public completely vaccinated," said Redfield, director of the CDC.

When Dr. Anthony Fauci testified he said that about 50 million doses of all the viable vaccine candidates will be available in November, and more in December, and that those doses will be prioritized to health care providers and vulnerable populations.

ABC News' Stephanie Ebbs contributed to this report.


Sep 23, 11:11 am
Fauci: 'Disturbing number' of COVID-19 patients have heart inflammation

At a Senate hearing on COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci on Wednesday addressed some lesser-publicized side effects seen among some COVID-19 "long-haulers": heart inflammation and cognitive abnormalities.

"A disturbing number of individuals" who have recovered from COVID-19 and "apparently are asymptomatic," "when they have sensitive imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging or MRI," they're found to "have inflammation of the heart," Fauci said.

Fauci also said a symptom among COVID-19 "long-haulers" is "cognitive abnormalities," like the inability to concentrate.

"These are the kinds of things that tell us we must be humbled that we do not completely understand the nature of this illness,” stressed Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), also testified Wednesday, noting that young people -- 18 to 25 year olds -- are making up 26% of new infections.

ABC News' Anne Flaherty contributed to this report.

Sep 23, 6:54 am
Navajo Nation reinstates stay-at-home order


As COVID-19 cases rise, the Navajo Nation is re-issuing a strict stay-at-home order and a 57-hour weekend lockdown. The increase in cases is in the Sage Memorial Hospital service area in Arizona and in satellite chapters in the Eastern Navajo Agency.

Many of these new cases are a result of family gatherings and people traveling to areas outside of the Navajo Nation and returning with the virus, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said in a statement.

"These new cluster cases are very troubling because we do not yet know the extent to which these individuals came into contact with people in the general public,” Nez said Tuesday.

The lockdown begins at 8 p.m. on Sept 25 and ends at 5 a.m. on Sept 28. There is also a daily curfew from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. on weekdays.

The Navajo Nation previously implemented public health emergency orders that restricted in-person gatherings and traveling off the Nation.

“We have told our people repeatedly that there remains substantial risk if you choose to travel off the Nation and hold family gatherings. Cities and towns near the Navajo Nation continue to see large increases in daily COVID-19 cases. It only takes a few positive cases to lead to another surge and we all know that our health care system cannot handle another large surge," Nez said.

As of Sept. 22, there have been more than 10,000 COVID-19 cases in the Navajo Nation, with at least 548 deaths.

Sep 23, 5:10 am
Six New York City neighborhoods see increase in cases


In the city that was hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic, cases of COVID-19 are on the rise in six New York City neighborhoods, according to local health officials.

Due to an uptick in the Borough Park, Kew Gardens, Midwood, Edgemere-Far Rockaway, Flatbush, Bensonhurst and Williamsburg communities, the city announced a targeted response to slow the spread in these areas as part of its "Get Test Tuesday" initiative.

The Midwood, Borough Park and Bensonhurst neighborhoods saw a 4.71% increase in COVID-19 cases from the week ending Aug. 1 to the week ending Sept. 19. In that same period, Far Rockaway saw a 3.69% increase, Kew Gardens a 2.24% increase and Williamsburg a 2% increase.

The increases in these areas make up 20% of all cases citywide.

"At this point in time, these increases could potentially evolve into more widespread community transmission and spread to other neighborhoods unless action is taken," the city said in a statement.

To help combat the rising cases in these areas, Dave Chokshi, commissioner of health of the City of New York, said the city would increase its presence, communication and add testing in these neighborhoods.

"... we'll launch robocalls and WhatsApp messages, communications with houses of worship, core-four palm cards to businesses, distribution of masks, gloves, and hand sanitizer. We'll place additional ads in community newspapers and we'll offer new point-of-care testing resources in these six neighborhoods at both Urgent Care and community provider offices," Chokshi said at a press conference Tuesday. "We aim to be seen and heard, so sound trucks will broadcast core four messages in these neighborhoods as well."

Since the beginning of the pandemic, New York City has had more than 23,000 coronavirus-related deaths and 236,000 cases.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said with these upticks, combined with cooler weather, it's important for New Yorkers to continue to avoid large indoor gatherings.

"There are clear rules from the state on this," de Blasio said at a press conference Tuesday. "Large gatherings are still a problem both legally and in terms of the health problem they create. So, we need people to avoid that."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Coronavirus uptick in 6 NYC neighborhoods is 'cause for significant concern,' city says

iStock/ffrannyBY: AARON KATERSKY, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- After largely controlling the coronavirus through the summer, New York City health officials warned Wednesday of troubling spikes in cases in six neighborhoods across Brooklyn and Queens that they said “are cause for significant concern.”

The neighborhoods include Kew Gardens and Far Rockaway in Queens, Williamsburg in Brooklyn and a separate section of Brooklyn including Midwood, Borough Park and Bensonhurst that health officials are calling the “Ocean Parkway Cluster.”

The six neighborhoods make up 20% of all COVID-19 cases citywide as of Sept. 19 and the health department fears the increases could potentially evolve into more widespread transmission.

“I’m so distressed by the large increase in COVID in these four neighborhoods, including the Ocean Parkway area, which is where I grew up, went to synagogue, where my brother currently lives,” said Dr. Mitchell Katz, the CEO of NYC Health Hospitals.

Katz said the city was moving to immediately address the increase with leaders of Orthodox Jewish communities in each neighborhood, including automated calls in Yiddish and English, trucks driving through the neighborhoods blaring messages and distribution of masks, gloves and hand sanitizer.

"This virus doesn’t follow religious or political lines,” said Dr. John Brownstein, an epidemiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and an ABC News medical contributor. “Whenever you bring people together for events that don’t involve masks and social distancing you will have cases. We have seen these situations occur in many different sub-populations that are not following the science.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio, who earlier in the pandemic faced accusations by Hasidic Jews that he was unfairly singling them out, said the aim is not to point fingers but to teach an important lesson for the public as the nation moves toward a season when outdoor activities and social distancing become more difficult.

“What we know works is a lot of communications, making it easy for people to wear masks by distributing for free, leaders of the community setting a good example, and many leaders are doing that,” de Blasio said. “If some people don’t want to be helpful to their neighbors then we will take stronger action.”

Dr. Katz, who said his father-in-law died of coronavirus in Israel earlier this week, made a personal appeal to Orthodox Jews.

“In the absence of doing the right thing, we will have to be in a lockdown situation like they have in Israel,” Katz said. “We don’t want that. We want people to wear masks. We want them to stay apart, to not have large gatherings."

He added, “There are easier ways for us to go on with our lives.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


New York firefighter sues department over discrimination, racism, hostile work environment

iStock/FrankvandenBerghBY: KARMA ALLEN, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A New York state firefighter filed a discrimination lawsuit against the North Tonawanda Fire Department, saying he was bullied for his disability and harassed for making safety complaints against the department.

North Tonawanda firefighter Michael Zellner filed a complaint with the New York Division of Human Rights accusing Fire Chief Joseph Sikora and now-retired Assistant Chief Glenn Richau of bullying him because of his documented disabilities, according to court filings.

According to the complaint, Zellner has a documented disability related to anxiety and depression, and he tried to voice concerns about safety within the department, but he claimed he was harassed in return. He said he also has physical injuries to his back and knee stemming from incidents on the job

He also detailed several alleged incidents in which he felt punished and harassed after speaking up, accusing leaders of unfairly reprimanding him for petty infractions that did not earn co-workers the same punishment.

According to the complaint Sikora and Richau called him a "p----" at least once when he notified them about broken equipment. Zellner, who joined the department in 2006, also claimed he witnessed multiple instances of anti-Black racism from management.

In one instance, Zellner claims he heard Richau bragging about pulling over "two stupid f------ n------." In a separate incident, Zellner said he heard Richau say, "Do we even have to worry about Black people?" during a February 2019 training that referenced a Black victim and hospital patient. In the answer to the complaint, the city specifically denies these allegations.

The alleged racist comments were captured on audio recordings, Zellner said, and a co-worker told Division of Human Rights investigators that he also witnessed the training incident and recalled Richau saying something along the lines of "who cares? He's Black. Let him die."

An investigator with the Division of Human Rights confirmed the existence of recordings in connection with the case, according to Buffalo ABC affiliate WKBW, which said the n-word could be heard at least four times on audio, although it is unclear who made the statement.

"Unfortunately, I can't see the stuff that's been happening, happen and just look the other way," Zellner told WKBW. "But, I mean, it's costing me tremendously in a lot of ways."

"These guys are not good people. ... These guys are bad, evil guys," he added.

City attorney Luke Brown denied the allegations levied against the city and said it was first made aware of the firefighter's alleged disability when he filed the complaint, according to court documents filed with the Division of Human Rights. The city also rejected any claims that it violated New York State human rights laws and requested the matter to be heard in court if necessary, according to the filing. It has motioned for the case to be dismissed.

"As this is an ongoing legal and personnel matter, the City does not have any further comment then the Answer that was filed with the court, other than to note that the firefighter alleged to have made the comments no longer works for the City," Brown told ABC News in a statement Wednesday.

Furthermore, he said the city had not been provided with the recordings of the alleged racists comments "despite repeated attempts to obtain them from the claimant, his attorney and the Division of Human Rights."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


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